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THERMAL ISSUES IN EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES

Heat Transfer Performance of Aluminum Foams

[+] Author and Article Information
Simone Mancin

Dipartimento di Fisica Tecnica, Università di Padova, Via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova, Italysimone.mancin@unipd.it

Claudio Zilio

Dipartimento di Fisica Tecnica, Università di Padova, Via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova, Italyclaudio.zilio@unipd.it

Luisa Rossetto1

Dipartimento di Fisica Tecnica, Università di Padova, Via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova, Italyluisa.rossetto@unipd.it

Alberto Cavallini

Dipartimento di Fisica Tecnica, Università di Padova, Via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova, Italyalcav@unipd.it

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 133(6), 060904 (Mar 04, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003451 History: Received December 15, 2009; Revised October 27, 2010; Published March 04, 2011; Online March 04, 2011

Because of their interesting heat transfer and mechanical properties, metal foams have been proposed for several different applications, thermal and structural. This paper aims at pointing out the effective thermal fluid dynamic behavior of these new enhanced surfaces, which present high heat transfer area per unit of volume at the expense of high pressure drop. The paper presents the experimental heat transfer and pressure drop measurements relative to air flowing in forced convection through four different aluminum foams, when electrically heated. The tested aluminum foams present 5, 10, 20 and 40 PPI (pores per inch), porosity around 0.92–0.93, and 0.02 m of foam core height. The experimental heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops have been obtained by varying the air mass flow rate and the electrical power, which has been set at 25.0kWm2, 32.5kWm2, and 40.0kWm2. The results have been compared against those measured for 40 mm high samples, in order to study the effects of the foam core height on the heat transfer. Moreover, predictions from two recent models are compared with heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop experimental data. The predictions are in good agreement with experimental data.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

A photo of the 40 PPI aluminum foam used in this experimental campaign

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Figure 2

Schematic of the experimental test rig

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Figure 3

Uncertainty of the calibrated orifice flow meter, calculated according to EN ISO 5167-1:1991/A1:1998 (17) as a function of the diameter ratio, β

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Figure 4

Top view and cross sections of the bakelite channel located in the stainless steel test section

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Figure 5

Global heat transfer coefficient referred to the base area of the sample versus air mass flow rate for Al-5-8.0. HF=heat flux (kW m−2).

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Figure 6

Global heat transfer coefficients of 20 mm high aluminum foams plotted against the air mass flow rate. Heat flux: HF=25.0 kW m−2.

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Figure 7

Comparison between 40 PPI aluminum foams with different foam core heights. Data for 40 mm high sample by Mancin (13).

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Figure 8

Comparison between 5 PPI aluminum foams with different foam core heights. Data for 40 mm high sample by Mancin (13).

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Figure 9

Normalized mean wall temperature (Eq. 4) versus air mass flow rate. HF=25.0 kW m−2.

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Figure 10

Comparison between calculated and experimental global heat transfer coefficients. Model by Mancin (13).

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Figure 11

Experimental pressure drops plotted against air mass velocity for the six test samples. Data for 40 mm high samples by Mancin (24).

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Figure 12

Comparison between calculated and experimental pressure gradients. Model by Mancin (24).

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