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Technical Briefs

Experimental Investigation of a Pulsating Heat Pipe Using Ferrofluid (Magnetic Nanofluid)

[+] Author and Article Information
Maziar Mohammadi

 Center of Excellence in Energy Conversion (CEEC), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9567, Tehran, Iran

Mohammad Mohammadi

 School of Chemical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9465, Tehran, Iran

M. B. Shafii1

 Center of Excellence in Energy Conversion (CEEC), School of Mechanical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9567, Tehran, IranBehshad@sharif.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 134(1), 014504 (Nov 21, 2011) (3 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004805 History: Received February 01, 2011; Accepted July 27, 2011; Published November 21, 2011; Online November 21, 2011

In this work, a four-turn pulsating heat pipe (PHP) is fabricated and tested experimentally. The novelty of the present PHP is the capability to obtain various thermal performances at a specific heat input by changing the magnetic field. The effects of working fluid (water and ferrofluid), charging ratio (40% and 70%), heat input (35, 45, 55, 65, 75, and 85 W), orientation (horizontal and vertical heat mode), ferrofluid volumetric concentration (2.5% and 7%), and magnetic field on the thermal performance of PHPs are investigated. The results showed that applying the magnetic field on the water-based ferrofluid reduced the thermal resistance of PHP in all orientations. In the presence of a magnetic field, the best thermal performance was achieved at the higher charging ratios (70%) in all orientations.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of experimental set-up

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Figure 2

Thermal resistance as a function of heat input at 40% and 70% charging ratios and in the horizontal mode

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Figure 3

Thermal resistance versus heat input in vertical mode for charging ratios of 40% and 70%

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Figure 4

Variation of thermal resistance at different concentrations in vertical mode

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