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HEAT TRANSFER IN NANOCHANNELS, MICROCHANNELS, AND MINICHANNELS

Forced Convection Heat Transfer Using High Temperature and Pressure Water in an Upward-Inclined Tube

[+] Author and Article Information
Wu Gang, Han Wang, Zhendong Yang, Xiaojing Zhu, Zhihong Hu

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering,  Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi, 710049, Chinaqcbi@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Qincheng Bi1

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering,  Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shanxi, 710049, Chinaqcbi@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 134(2), 020905 (Dec 13, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004901 History: Received November 06, 2010; Revised August 13, 2011; Published December 13, 2011; Online December 13, 2011

Within the range of pressure from 9 to 28 MPa, mass flux from 600 to 1500 kg/m2 s, heat flux at inside wall from 200 to 600 kW/m2 , and wall temperature up to 650 °C, experiments were conducted to research the forced convection heat transfer of water in an inclined upward tube with an inclination angle of 20 deg and an inner diameter of 26 mm. According to the experimental data, the effects of pressure and heat flux on heat transfer of water were analyzed in detail. In the subcritical pressure region, it was found that heat transfer characteristics of water are not uniform along the circumference of the inclined tube. Temperature of the top is always higher than that of the bottom, which can be attributed to the buoyancy effect in the inclined tube. In the supercritical pressure region, natural convection makes the low-density hot fluid gather at the top of the inclined tube; hence, heat transfer condition is deteriorated and wall temperature is increased. Furthermore, the criterions of Petukhov and Jackson were selected to judge the buoyancy effect in the inclined upward tube. The result seems acceptable but these criterions should be further improved to get a better applicability for an inclined tube.

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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic diagram of the high pressure water loop system

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Figure 2

Heating test tube and thermocouples arrangement

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Figure 3

(a) Circumferential distribution of inside wall temperature, (b) Circumferential distribution of inside wall heat flux and (c) Circumferential distribution of inside wall temperature

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Figure 4

The effect of pressure on the specific heat of water

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Figure 5

Thermophysical properties variations of water at 25 MPa

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Figure 6

The effect of pressure on inside wall temperature in supercritical pressure region

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Figure 7

The effect of pressure on inside wall temperature in subcritical pressure region

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Figure 8

The effect of heat flux on inside wall temperature in supercritical pressure region

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Figure 9

The effect of heat flux on inside wall temperature in subcritical pressure region

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Figure 10

(a) The effect of steam quality on critical heat flux at a pressure of 16 MPa, (b) The effect of steam quality on critical heat flux at a pressure of 21 MPa, and (c) The effect of pressure on critical quality at a heat flux of 300 kW/m2

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Figure 11

Natural convection in the inclined tube with 20 deg inclined angle

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Figure 12

The relationship of buoyancy and heat transfer coefficient difference between the top and bottom of inclined tube

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Figure 13

Comparison of Jackson criterion and experimental values

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