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Research Papers

Heat and Mass Transfer in Solid State Hydrogen Storage: A Review

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Srinivasa Murthy

Professor of Refrigeration and Clean Energy Technologies, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036, Indiassmurthy@iitm.ac.in

J. Heat Transfer 134(3), 031020 (Jan 20, 2012) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005156 History: Received September 17, 2010; Revised April 23, 2011; Published January 20, 2012; Online January 20, 2012

Metal hydrides are formed when certain metals or alloys are exposed to hydrogen at favorable temperatures and pressures. In order to sustain the sorption of hydrogen during this exothermic process, the generated heat has to be removed effectively. Release of hydrogen is an endothermic process needing supply of heat to the metal hydride matrix. Depending on the application, the heat transfer medium can be either a liquid or a gas. Reduction of the total weight of hydrogen storage devices is essential toward utilization of hydrogen for mobile and portable applications. While a variety of new storage materials with desirable sorption characteristics are being suggested, optimal thermal design of the storage device remains a major challenge. Lack of thermodynamic, transport, and thermophysical property data of the material particles and of the bed is another drawback which needs to be addressed.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 7

Effect of supply pressure on hydride formation [7]

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Figure 8

Schematic of tubular metal hydride storage device with external fins [5]

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Figure 9

Schematic of tubular metal hydride storage device with plate fins [6]

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Figure 10

Effect of external radial fins on hydriding rate [5]

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Figure 11

Effect of s/d ratio on charging time at different bed thicknesses [6]

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Figure 12

Effect of s/d ratio on system weight at different bed thicknesses [6]

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Figure 6

Effect of pitch distance on total system weight at different charging rates [4]

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Figure 1

Variation of effective thermal conductivity with gas pressure

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Figure 2

Variation of effective thermal conductivity with concentration during absorption

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Figure 3

Schematic of cylindrical metal hydride storage device [(4),7]

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Figure 4

Effect of tube diameter on charging time at different bed thicknesses [4]

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Figure 5

Influence of tube dia. on total system weight at different bed thicknesses [4]

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