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Research Papers: Combustion and Reactive Flows

Numerical Analysis of Depollution of Smoke Produced by Household Wastes Incineration

[+] Author and Article Information
K. N’Wuitcha, M. Banna

 GPTE-LES, University of Lome, PO Box 1515, Lome, Togo

S. W. Igo

IRSAT/CNRST-Department of Energy, 03 PO Box 7047, Ouagadougou 03, Burkina-Faso

B. Zeghmati1

 LA.M.P.S-GME, University of Perpignan Via Domitia, 52 Avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan Cedex, Francezeghmati@univ-perp.fr

K. Palm

IRSAT/CNRST-Department of Energy, 03 PO Box 7047, Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso

X. Chesneau

 LA.M.P.S-GME, University of Perpignan Via Domitia, 52 Avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan Cedex, France

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 134(4), 041203 (Feb 15, 2012) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005204 History: Received March 01, 2011; Revised September 19, 2011; Published February 15, 2012; Online February 15, 2012

This study reports the results on a numerical investigation of the depollution of smokes produced by the incineration of household wastes in a cylindrical furnace. Transfers are described by double-diffusive mixed convection equations, associated to radiative transfer equation, and a global kinetics model. The governing equations are discretized using finite volume method and the resulting algebraic equations are solved by THOMAS algorithm. The linkage between the pressure and velocity fields is assumed by SIMPLE algorithm. Results are presented as streamlines, isotherms, isoconcentrations for different Reynolds number (300 ≤ Re ≤ 1800). Effects of Reynolds number, relative height opening, aspect ratio, excess air ratio, and radiative transfers on gas pollutants (CO, CH4 , C2 H4 …) destruction are investigated in detail.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 9

Mass fractions and mass rates production of CH4 and CO2 versus time with chemical reaction and without radiation

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Figure 10

Streamlines (a), isotherms (b), and isoconcentration of CH4 (c) with chemical reaction and radiative transfers: Re = 600; t′ = 6 s; A0 = 25%; A = 1; B = 1/5

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Figure 11

Mass fractions of chemical species versus time at the outlet port of the incinerator with chemical reactions. Effect of radiative transfers: Re = 600; A0 = 25%; A = 1; B = 1/4.

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Figure 12

Efficiency of the thermo-destruction process without radiation: (a) Effect of Reynolds number, (b) effect of excess air ratio, (c), effect of aspect ratio A = H′/D′ and (d) effect of relative height of the openings B = d ′in /D′

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Figure 1

A schematic diagram of problem

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Figure 2

Comparison of streamlines (a) and isotherms (b) profiles

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Figure 3

(a) Comparison of dimensionless radial heat flux profiles and (b) species mass fractions profiles

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Figure 4

Streamlines (a), isotherms (b), and isoconcentration of CH4 (c) without thermo-destruction process and radiation: Re = 600; A0 = 25%; A = 1; B = 1/5

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Figure 5

Streamlines (a), isotherms (b), isoconcentration of CH4 (c): Re = 600; A0 = 25%; A = 1; B = 1/5

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Figure 6

Streamlines (a), isotherms (b), and isoconcentrations of CH4 (c) with thermo-destruction process and without radiation: t′ = 6 s; Re = 600; A0 = 25%; A = 1; B = 1/5

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Figure 7

Temperature and heat rate production (a), mass fraction and mass rate production of CH4 (b) versus radial distance with chemical reaction and without radiation

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Figure 8

Temperature and heat rate production versus time with chemical reaction and without radiation

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