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Research Papers: Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer

Prediction of the Thermal Conductivity of ZnO Nanostructures

[+] Author and Article Information
P. Chantrenne1

Centre de Thermique de Lyon CETHIL UMR 5008,  Université de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, CNRS Université de Lyon 1, Lyon F-69621, FrancePatrice.chantrenne@insa-lyon.fr

C. Ould-Lahoucine

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Guelma, 24000 Guelma, Algeriafulbrighter@hotmail.com

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 134(4), 042401 (Feb 13, 2012) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005164 History: Received September 21, 2011; Published February 13, 2012; Online February 13, 2012

The kinetic theory of gas is used to predict the specific heat and thermal conductivity of ZnO nanostructures. In this model, phonons are considered as a gas whose basic properties are given by phonon dispersion curves. The model also requires knowledge of the boundary relaxation time parameter (F), the defect relaxation time parameter D, and the relaxation time parameters which take into account lattice anisotropy. These parameters can be determined independently from experimental measurements. Excellent agreements were found when comparing both the estimated specific heat and thermal conductivity to bulk sample measurement data. Comparison with previous results obtained with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations leads to the conclusion that for ultra narrow nanobelts, thermal conductivity depends on their length. Behavior of the thermal conductivity of nanofilms is also studied. The results are consistent with previous works on 1D and 2 D systems. Finally, the thermal conductivity of nanobelts is presented as are the influences of boundary and defect parameters.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

(a) Description of the elementary cell of the Würtzite structure of ZnO. a=0.3249 nm and (b) description of the first Brillouin zone of the hexagonal structure.

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Figure 2

Thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for samples 2 (//c) and 3 (//a) taken from [40]. Solid curve and dashed line: predicted values for samples 2 and 3, respectively. Circles and crosses: measured values for samples 2 and 3, respectively.

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Figure 3

Measured thermal conductivity for the samples R60 (//a, squares) and R61 (//c, circles) taken from [39] (full lines) compared to the prediction (lines)

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Figure 4

Predicted thermal conductivity of 30 × 30 nm2 nanobelt for D = 0 s3 (no impurity) and different values of parameter F

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Figure 5

Predicted thermal conductivity of 30 × 30 nm2 nanobelt for F = 1 and different values of parameter D

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Figure 6

Thermal conductivity calculated for a nanowire whose cross section is equal to 30 nm × 30 nm and whose length is oriented in direction a and for the same nanowire geometry but for which the length is oriented in direction c (F = 1 and D = 0)

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Figure 7

Thermal conductivity of nanowires as a function of their length for different cross sections (T=300 K, F = 1, and D = 0)

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Figure 8

Thermal conductivity of nanofilms as a function of their in-plane size for different thicknesses (T = 300 K, F = 1, and D = 0)

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Figure 9

Thermal conductivity of an ultra narrow NB versus its length for different widths (T = 300 K, F = 1, and D = 0). Comparison with NW and NF with the same thickness.

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Figure 10

Thermal conductivity of a large NB versus its length for different widths (T = 300 K, F = 1, and D = 0). Comparison with NW and NF with the same thickness.

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