0
Research Papers: Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer

Heat Transfer Across Metal-Dielectric Interfaces During Ultrafast-Laser Heating

[+] Author and Article Information
Liang Guo, Stephen L. Hodson, Timothy S. Fisher

School of Mechanical Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center,  Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907xxu@purdue.edu

Xianfan Xu1

School of Mechanical Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center,  Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907xxu@purdue.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 134(4), 042402 (Feb 13, 2012) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005255 History: Received May 18, 2011; Revised September 30, 2011; Published February 13, 2012; Online February 13, 2012

Heat transfer across metal-dielectric interfaces involves transport of electrons and phonons accomplished either by coupling between phonons in metal and dielectric or by coupling between electrons in metal and phonons in dielectric. In this work, we investigate heat transfer across metal-dielectric interfaces during ultrafast-laser heating of thin metal films coated on dielectric substrates. By employing ultrafast-laser heating that creates strong thermal nonequilibrium between electrons and phonons in metal, it is possible to isolate the effect of the direct electron–phonon coupling across the interface and thus facilitate its study. Transient thermo-reflectance measurements using femtosecond laser pulses are performed on Au–Si samples while the simulation results based on a two-temperature model are compared with the measured data. A contact resistance between electrons in Au and phonons in Si represents the coupling strength of the direct electron–phonon interactions at the interface. Our results reveal that this contact resistance can be sufficiently small to indicate strong direct coupling between electrons in metal and phonons in dielectric.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

TTR measurement results for the Au–Si sample of Au thickness 77 nm with different fluences. (a) Results before pulse stretching; (b) results after pulse stretching.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

TTR measurement results on Au–Si samples of varying Au thicknesses

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Simulation results with varying Res for the Au–Si sample of Au thickness 39 nm. (a) Rps  = 1 × 10−10 m2 K/W; (b) Rps = 1×10−7 m2 K/W.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Comparison between the measurement and the simulation results for Au–Si samples of different Au thicknesses. The open circle represents the measured data and the solid line represents the simulation results. (a) 39 nm fitted by Res  = 5 × 10−10 m2 K/W; (b) 46 nm fitted by Res  = 6 × 10−10 m2 K/W; (c) 60 nm fitted by Res  = 1.2 × 10−9 m2 K/W; and (d) 77 nm fitted by Res  = 1.8 × 10−9 m2 K/W.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In