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Research Papers

Silicon Nanowire Conductance in the Ballistic Regime: Models and Simulations

[+] Author and Article Information
David Lacroix

 LEMTA,Nancy Université,CNRS Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex, France e-mail: david.lacroix@lemta.uhp-nancy.fr

Karl Joulain

 LET,Université de Poitiers,CNRS Bâtiment de mécanique 40, av. du recteur Pineau, 86022 Poitiers Cedex, France e-mail: karl.joulain@univ-poitiers.fr

Jerome Muller

Gilles Parent

 LEMTA,Nancy Université,CNRS Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy Cedex, Francegilles.parent@lemta.uhp-nancy.fr

J. Heat Transfer 134(5), 051007 (Apr 13, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005637 History: Received April 13, 2010; Revised March 23, 2011; Published April 11, 2012; Online April 13, 2012

This study deals with phonon heat transport in silicon nanowires. A review of various methods that can be used to assess thermal conductance of such nanodevices is presented. Here, a specific attention is paid to the case of the Landauer Formalism, which can describe extremely thin wires conductance. In order to use this technique, the calculation of propagating modes in a silicon nanowire is necessary. Among the several existing models allowing such calculation, the elastic wave theory has been used to obtain the normal mode number. Besides, in this study, the transmission and reflection of phonon at the interface between two nanostructures are discussed. Using the diffuse mismatch model (DMM), the global transmissivity of the system made of a nanowire suspended between two thermal reservoirs is addressed. Then, the calculations of normal modes’ numbers and thermal conductances of several silicon nanowires, with various diameters set between bulk thermal reservoirs, are presented and compared to other models and available experiments.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Nanowire between two thermal reservoirs

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Figure 2

Silicon nanowire torsional modes (d = 20 nm)

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Figure 3

Silicon nanowire flexural modes (d = 20 nm)

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Figure 4

Dimensionless mode frequency versus mode number (d = 20 nm) for different models

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Figure 5

Nanowire between bulk reservoirs transmissivity (d = 20 nm)

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Figure 6

Nanowire conductance, effect of the diameter (1D model)

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Figure 7

Nanowire conductance, effect of the diameter (3D model)

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Figure 8

Transition temperatures between 1D and 3D models; Nmodes and four fundamental modes assumptions

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Figure 9

Transition temperature variations versus nanowire diameter

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Figure 10

Nanowire conductance, mode number (d = 20 nm and d = 17 nm—bulk (LA+TA) modes in the reservoirs)

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