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Research Papers

Transient Characteristics of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer in Nanofluids

[+] Author and Article Information
Sang M. Kwark1

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department,  The University of Texas at Arlington, 500 W. First Street, Arlington, TX 76019

Ratan Kumar, Gilberto Moreno, Seung M. You

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department,  The University of Texas at Arlington, 500 W. First Street, Arlington, TX 76019

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 134(5), 051015 (Apr 13, 2012) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005706 History: Received April 29, 2010; Revised May 26, 2010; Published April 11, 2012; Online April 13, 2012

This study shows the transient characteristics of the pool boiling curves using nanofluid as the boiling fluid. This time-dependency is in sharp contrast to a unique steady-state pool boiling curve that is typically obtained for a pure fluid. Past nanofluids research has provided interesting information about the thermal characteristics for this potentially promising cooling fluid. Results from these studies have shown some extraordinary critical heat flux (CHF) values and thermal conductivity enhancement that is yet to be explained by existing theories and correlations. The nature of the pool boiling curve for a nanofluid is dependent on the nanoparticle concentration in the base fluid. Higher concentration nanofluids show a perceptible degradation in the boiling heat transfer (BHT) coefficient but have exhibited an enhanced CHF value (up to ∼80%) when compared to the CHF value of the base fluid (water). Another key observation has been in the significant deposition of nanoparticles on the heater surface. This fouling of the heater surface by nanoparticles is widely viewed as a main contributor that modifies the pool boiling curve of the base liquid. The deposition of the nanoparticles on the heater surface is dynamic and this in turn makes the nanofluid pool boiling curve exhibit transient characteristics.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematics of (a) test facility and (b) test heater assembly

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Figure 2

Pool boiling curves for Al2 O3 nanofluids (0.005 g/l to 1 g/l)

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Figure 3

CHF enhancement, defined as the ratio of nanofluid CHF over water CHF as predicted by Zuber’s correlation, for various Al2 O3 nanofluid concentrations

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Figure 4

SEM images showing nanoparticle deposition on the heater surface after the pool boiling test with 0.025 g/l and 1 g/l nanofluids

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Figure 5

Pool boiling curves repeated three times in 0.1 g/l Al2 O3 nanofluid

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Figure 6

SEM images taken after first and third run in 0.1 g/l Al2 O3 nanofluids

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Figure 7

Transient characteristics of the pool boiling curve for Al2 O3 nanofluid at 0.025 g/l and 1 g/l (Method 1 versus Method 2)

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Figure 8

Transient behavior of pool boiling heat transfer in nanofluids (0.025 g/l Al2 O3 ) by Kwark [18], showing a heat flux dependency

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Figure 9

Transient behavior of pool boiling heat transfer in nanofluids (0.025 g/l Al2 O3 ), showing a time dependency

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Figure 10

Pool boiling curves with intentional waiting at heat flux of 1500 kW/m2 in 1 g/l Al2 O3 nanofluid

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Figure 11

Image of the nanoparticle coating (right) generated on the heater surface from a single bubble (left)

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