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Melting and Solidification

Solidification and Melting Periods of an Ice-on-Coil Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage System

[+] Author and Article Information
Mehmet Akif Ezan

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkeymehmet.ezan@deu.edu.tr

Aytunc Erek1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkeymehmet.ezan@deu.edu.tr

1

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 134(6), 062301 (May 02, 2012) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005747 History: Received November 30, 2010; Revised November 03, 2011; Published April 30, 2012; Online May 02, 2012

This paper presents experimental investigations of charging (solidification) and discharging (internal/external melting) periods of an ice-on-coil type latent heat thermal energy storage system. Experimental investigations are performed for various constant heat loads and inlet temperatures with several flow rates of the heat transfer fluid. In experiments, variations of the solid/liquid interfaces around the tubes are monitored with the aid of 15 interface measurement cards for both solidification and melting periods. Energy variations obtained from the measurement cards are validated by conservation of energy, and the mean difference is obtained as 5%. The parametric results indicated that the inlet temperature and the flow rate of the secondary coolant are significant both on the charging and discharging capability of the system. It is also introduced that, for the current experimental conditions, external melting mode can supply relatively lower outlet temperatures for a longer period in comparison with the internal melting mode.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic representation of the ice−on−coil LHTES system: (a) top view, (b) front view

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Figure 2

Interface measurement card and variations of the resistivity

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Figure 3

Temperature, flow rate, and energy variations (Tin  = −8 °C and V· = 70 l/min)

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Figure 4

Total stored energy variations—validation of energy conservation

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Figure 5

Comparisons of the experimental and predicted results—Tin  = −8 °C, V·=70 l/min: (a) variations of the inlet–outlet temperatures of HTF with total mass of ice; (b) variation of the total stored energy

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Figure 6

Temperature variations inside the tank (Tin  = −8 °C and V· = 60 l/min)

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Figure 7

Interface variations inside the tank (Tin  = −8 °C and V· = 60 l/min): (a) interface variations at the top-outer-inlet card section; (b) interface variations at the center-outer-inlet card section; and (c) interface variations at the bottom-outer-inlet card section

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Figure 8

Interface variations along the flow direction (Tin  = −8 °C and V· = 60 l/min)

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Figure 9

Influence of the inlet temperature of the HTF on the total stored energy

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Figure 10

Influences of the flow rate and inlet temperature of the HTF on the total stored energy

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Figure 11

Timewise variations of the temperature difference for internal melting mode

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Figure 12

Influence of the inlet temperature and flow rate of the HTF on the total rejected energy for internal melting mode

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Figure 13

Timewise variations of inlet and outlet temperatures of HTF for various constant heat loads for internal melting mode

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Figure 14

Influences of the heat load and flow rate on the total rejected energy for internal melting mode

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Figure 15

Timewise variations of the inlet and the outlet temperatures of the HTF for various constant heat loads, for external melting mode

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Figure 16

Influence of the heat load and the flow rate on the total rejected energy for external melting mode

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