0
Radiative Heat Transfer

Direct Measurement of Thermal Emission From a Fabry–Perot Cavity Resonator

[+] Author and Article Information
L. P. Wang

George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu

S. Basu1

George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu

Z. M. Zhang2

George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu

1

Present address: Assembly Technology Department, Intel Corporation, Chandler, AZ 85226.

2

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 134(7), 072701 (May 18, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006088 History: Received June 13, 2011; Revised October 31, 2011; Published May 17, 2012; Online May 18, 2012

There have been growing interests in selective control of thermal emission by using micro/nanostructures. The present study describes direct measurements of infrared thermal emission at elevated temperatures of an asymmetric Fabry–Perot resonator at variable angles for each polarization. The multilayered structure mainly contains a SiO2 optical cavity sandwiched between a thick (opaque) Au film and a thin Au film. Metallic adhesive and diffusion-barrier layers were deposited on a Si substrate before depositing the thick Au film. A dielectric protection layer was deposited atop the thin Au film to prevent oxidation at high temperatures. A SiC wafer was used as the reference to test the emittance measurement facility, which includes a heated sample holder, a blackbody source, mirror assembly, a polarizer, and a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer with different detectors. The measured emittance spectra of the Fabry–Perot structure exhibit peak broadening and shifting as temperature increases; the mechanisms are elucidated by comparison with theoretical modeling.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

(a) Optical layout of the high-temperature emissometer, consisting of a blackbody, a heater assembly mounted on a rotary stage, an FTIR spectrometer, and optical components. (b) Schematic of the heater assembly.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Measured emittance spectra of the SiC sample for 10 deg at 294 K (before and after heating) and for normal direction at 800 K. The emittance at 294 K is obtained indirectly from the measured reflectance using Kirchhoff’s law, while the emittance at 800 K is directly measured with the emissometer.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

The measured 30 deg emittance of the SiC sample at 294 K (before heating) and 800 K: (a) TE waves and (b) TM waves

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Schematic of the fabricated Fabry–Perot cavity resonator (not to scale), indicating the directions for indirect measurements. For direct emittance measurement, the direction of emission follows the reversed wavevector K.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

The emittance spectra of the Fabry–Perot cavity resonator sample for 10 deg at 294 K and for normal direction at 600 K and 800 K from (a) measurement and (b) modeling. The emittance was directly measured at 600 K with an InSb detector and 800 K with a DTGS detector.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

The emittance of the Fabry–Perot cavity resonator sample at 30 deg. (a) Measurement for TE waves; (b) measurement for TM waves; (c) prediction for TE waves; and (d) prediction for TM waves.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

(a) Comparison of the calculated emittance of a three-layer SiO2 –Au–SiO2 structure and the considered Fabry–Perot structure at 30 deg for TM waves. (b) The optical constants of SiO2 from Palik [22].

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

(a) An image of the cracks in the Fabry–Perot cavity resonator sample after the heating at 800 K from a 3D confocal microscope. (b) Measured emittance (10 deg) of the Fabry– Perot sample at room temperature before and after heating up to 800 K.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In