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Natural and Mixed Convection

Natural Convection With Micro-Encapsulated Phase Change Material

[+] Author and Article Information
R. Sabbah

Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department,  Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, ILsabbram@iit.edu

J. Seyed-Yagoobi

Mechanical, Materials, and Aerospace Engineering Department,  Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, ILyagoobi@iit.edu

S. Al-Hallaj

Department of Chemical Engineering,  University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, ILsah@uic.edu

J. Heat Transfer 134(8), 082503 (Jun 08, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006158 History: Received June 19, 2011; Revised January 12, 2012; Published June 08, 2012; Online June 08, 2012

This study numerically explores the effect of presence of micro-encapsulated phase change material (MEPCM) on the heat transfer characteristics of a fluid in a rectangular cavity driven by natural convection. The natural convection is generated by the temperature difference between two vertical walls at constant temperatures. The phase change material (PCM) melts in the vicinity of the hot wall and solidifies near the cold wall. Unlike the pure fluids, the heat transfer characteristics of MEPCM slurry cannot be simply presented in terms of corresponding dimensionless controlling parameters such as Rayleigh number. In the presence of phase change particles, the controlling parameters’ values change significantly due to the local phase change. The numerical results show significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient (up to 80%) at the considered operating conditions. This increase is a result of the MEPCM latent heat and the increased volumetric thermal expansion coefficient due to MEPCM volume change during melting.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Computational domain

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Figure 2

Volumetric thermal expansion coefficient versus temperature for MEPCM particles, 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% MEPCM slurries

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Figure 3

MEPCM specific heat derived from the DSC test

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Figure 4

(a) Velocity contours (b) Temperature contours and velocity vectors; 25% MEPCM slurry, Th  = 27.5 °C, Tc  = 24 °C

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Figure 5

Average heat transfer coefficient versus MEPCM slurry concentration

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Figure 6

Average Rayleigh number versus MEPCM slurry concentration

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Figure 7

Average heat transfer coefficient enhancement versus MEPCM slurry concentration

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Figure 8

Average Rayleigh number enhancement versus MEPCM slurry concentration

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Figure 9

Average dynamic viscosity increase versus MEPCM slurry concentration

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