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Experimental Techniques

Adiabatic Wall Temperature Evaluation in a High Speed Turbine

[+] Author and Article Information
V. Pinilla1

von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Turbomachinery and Propulsion Department, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Rhode Saint Genèse, Belgiumgpaniagua@me.com

J. P. Solano2

von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Turbomachinery and Propulsion Department, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Rhode Saint Genèse, Belgiumgpaniagua@me.com

G. Paniagua3

von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Turbomachinery and Propulsion Department, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Rhode Saint Genèse, Belgiumgpaniagua@me.com

R. J. Anthony

Air Force Research Laboratory, Propulsion Directorate, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH 45433

1

Present address: Industria de Turbopropulsores S.A., Parque Tecnológico de Zamudio, Edificio 300, 48170 Zamudio, Spain.

2

Present address: Dep. Ingeniería Térmica y de Fluidos, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Campus Muralla del Mar, 30202 Cartagena, Spain.

3

Corresponding author.

J. Heat Transfer 134(9), 091601 (Jul 09, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006313 History: Received September 18, 2011; Revised March 04, 2012; Published July 09, 2012; Online July 09, 2012

Engine development requires accurate estimates of the heat loads. Estimates of the convective heat fluxes are particularly vital to assess the thermomechanical integrity of the turbomachinery components. This paper reports an experimental heat transfer research in a one and a half turbine stage, composed of a high-pressure turbine and a low-pressure vane. Measurements were performed in a compression tube facility at the von Karman Institute, able to reproduce engine representative Reynolds and Mach numbers. Double-layered thin film gauges were used to monitor the time-dependent temperature distribution around the airfoil. Several tests at different metal temperatures were performed to derive the adiabatic wall temperature. This research allowed quantifying the independent effects on the unsteady heat flux of the gas temperature fluctuations and boundary layer unsteadiness.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

(a) Temperature traces and (b) computed heat flux

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Figure 2

(a) Compression tube facility; (b) test section of the wind tunnel; and (c) high-pressure turbine and multisplittered low-pressure turbine

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Figure 3

Left: Structural vane instrumented with double-layered thin film gauges. Electrical resistors are deposited on the hub and tip. Right: Thin-film nickel sensor.

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Figure 4

Numerical assessment of the initial temperature distribution under uniform heating

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Figure 5

Temperature evolution during the testing sequence for five different substrate initial temperatures

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Figure 6

Variation of wall heat flux with the wall substrate temperature in one gauge

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Figure 7

Unsteady heat flux, adiabatic wall temperature, and convective heat transfer in function of the rotor position for a typical gauge

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Figure 8

(a) Static pressure distribution; (b) RMS of the heat flux; (c) adiabatic wall temperature; (d) Nusselt number based on the hydraulic diameter; and (e) Nusselt number based on the axial chord

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Figure 9

Unsteady adiabatic wall temperature

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Figure 10

(a) Influence of the unsteady terms haw′·Taw′¯ on the time-averaged heat flux. (b) Influence on the unsteady heat flux amplitude of the unsteady flow temperature, and unsteady boundary layer and the h′aw ·T′aw term.

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Figure 11

Contributions to the unsteady heat flux q′: terms (c), (d), and (e) in Eq. 10

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