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Experimental Study on Fundamental Phenomena of Boiling Using Heat Transfer Surfaces With Well-Defined Cavities Created by MEMS (Effect of Spacing Between Cavities)

[+] Author and Article Information
Takato Sato

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Kogakuin University, 2665-1 Nakano-machi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0015, Japanad06002@ns.kogakuin.ac.jp

Yasuo Koizumi

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Kogakuin University, 2665-1 Nakano-machi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0015, Japankoizumiy@shinshu-u.ac.jp

Hiroyasu Ohtake

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Kogakuin University, 2665-1 Nakano-machi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0015, Japanat10988@ns.kogakuin.ac.jp

J. Heat Transfer 130(8), 084501 (May 29, 2008) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2927399 History: Received August 01, 2006; Revised March 05, 2008; Published May 29, 2008

Pool nucleate boiling heat transfer experiments were performed for water using heat transfer surfaces having unified cavities. Cylindrical holes of 10μm in diameter and 40μm in depth were formed on a mirror-finished silicon wafer of 0.525mm in thickness using Microelectromechanical systems technology. The test heat transfer surface was heated by a semiconductor laser beam. Experiments were conducted in the range of up to 4.54×104Wm2. The temperature of the back side of the heat transfer surface was measured by a radiation thermometer. When the spacing between cavities was SLc<0.8, the horizontal and declining coalescence of bubbles on the neighboring cavities were dominant. Strong thermal and bubble coalescence interactions between nucleation sites were observed in this situation. This vigorous bubble coalescence created strong convection. The heat carried by this convection accounted for a large part of the heat transfer. As the cavity interval became wide, SLc1.2, the horizontal and the declining coalescence of the bubbles ceased. The coalescence was limited to the vertical or no coalescence. The thermal and bubble coalescence interactions between the nucleation sites became quite low, to the extent of being negligible. The bubbles themselves were key in carrying heat away from the heat transfer surface.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Experimental apparatus

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Figure 2

Thermal intensity (three cavities)

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Figure 3

Bubble coalescence

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Figure 4

Bubble agitation effect

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Figure 5

Relation between phase change and convective heat transfer

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