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Research Papers: Radiative Heat Transfer

Simulation of Laser-Induced Incandescence Measurements in an Anisotropically Scattering Aerosol Through Backward Monte Carlo

[+] Author and Article Information
K. J. Daun1

Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology, National Research Council of Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0R6, Canadakjdaun@mme.uwaterloo.ca

K. A. Thomson, F. Liu

Institute for Chemical Process and Environmental Technology, National Research Council of Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0R6, Canada

1

Corresponding author. Presently at Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1, Canada.

J. Heat Transfer 130(11), 112701 (Aug 29, 2008) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2955468 History: Received August 28, 2007; Revised November 27, 2007; Published August 29, 2008

Laser-induced incandescence (LII) measurements carried out in aerosols having a large particle volume fraction must be corrected to account for extinction between the energized aerosol particles and the detector, called signal trapping. While standard correction techniques have been developed for signal trapping by absorption, the effect of scattering on LII measurements requires further investigation, particularly the case of highly anisotropic scattering and along a path of relatively large optical thickness. This paper examines this phenomenon in an aerosol containing highly aggregated soot particles by simulating LII signals using a backward Monte Carlo analysis; these signals are then used to recover the soot particle temperature and soot volume fraction. The results show that inscattered radiation is a substantial component of the LII signal under high soot loading conditions, which can strongly influence properties derived from these measurements. Correction techniques based on Bouguer’s law are shown to be effective in mitigating the effect of scatter on the LII signals.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Problem geometry for the sheet excitation case

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Figure 2

Optics schematic shown for beam excitation case (not to scale)

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Figure 3

Scattering phase functions

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Figure 4

Bundles emitted backward from the detector surface either travel directly to the beam are inscattered to the beam or outscattered away from the beam

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Figure 5

Comparison of FMC and BMC efficiencies for the beam excitation case at λd=400nm

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Figure 6

Detector signal versus soot volume fraction

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Figure 7

Ratio of direct to total detector flux versus soot volume fraction

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Figure 8

Comparison of correction schemes for the beam excitation case at λd=400nm

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Figure 9

Comparison of correction schemes for the sheet excitation case at λd=400nm

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Figure 10

Relative errors in beam temperature derived using beam excitation

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Figure 11

Relative errors in beam temperature derived using sheet excitation

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Figure 12

Relative errors in soot volume fraction derived using beam excitation

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Figure 13

Relative errors in soot volume fraction derived using sheet excitation

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