0
Research Papers: Radiative Heat Transfer

Discrete Ordinates and Monte Carlo Methods for Radiative Transfer Simulation Applied to Computational Fluid Dynamics Combustion Modeling

[+] Author and Article Information
David Joseph, Patrice Perez

 Centre de Recherche d’Albi en génie des Procédés des Solides Divisés, de l’Energie et de l’Environnement, 81000 Albi, France; HPC-SA, 3 Chemin du Pigeonnier de la Cépière, 31100 Toulouse, France

Mouna El Hafi

 Centre de Recherche d’Albi en génie des Procédés des Solides Divisés, de l’Energie et de l’Environnement, 81013 Albi, Franceelhafi@enstimac.fr

Bénédicte Cuenot

 CERFACS, 42 Avenue Gaspard Coriolis, 31057 Toulouse, France

J. Heat Transfer 131(5), 052701 (Mar 19, 2009) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3013832 History: Received February 29, 2008; Revised October 09, 2008; Published March 19, 2009

Modeling radiative heat transfer in combustion applications involving complex geometries and detailed spectral properties of radiative gaseous species remains a difficult challenge, especially when full coupling with detailed chemistry and fluid dynamics is required. The Monte Carlo method (MCM) usually considered as a reference “exact” method for the computation of radiative transfer is however very demanding in CPU-time. An alternative is the discrete ordinates method (DOM), based on a finite volume approach, that is more suitable for a direct coupling with computational fluid dynamics but may lack accuracy. The aim of the present paper is to propose and demonstrate the efficiency of a methodology for radiative transfer calculation, combining the advantages of both MCM and DOM. In this approach, the fast DOM is used to compute the radiative solution, and its accuracy is controlled by comparison with the exact MCM solution at a selected controlling points. A first application of the proposed methodology to an industrial burner prototype shows its validity and potential for the direct coupling of radiation calculations with unsteady reacting flow computations.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Cylindrical grid (100,000 cells)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Radiative source term along the central axis of the cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Incident radiative heat flux at the wall of the cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Relative error associated to the MCM radiative source term along the central axis of the cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Relative error associated to the MCM incident radiative heat flux at the wall of the cylinder

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Grid of the combustion chamber

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Instantaneous solution fields in the median cutting plane of the combustion chamber: temperature and radiative species concentration; (a) temperature profile, (b) XH2O profile, (c) XCO2 profile, and (d) XCO profile

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Instantaneous heat release ω̇ in the median cutting plane of the combustion chamber

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Instantaneous radiative source term in the median cutting plane of the combustion chamber; calculation with DOM-S4 quadrature

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Radiative incident heat flux G, radiative emitted heat flux E, and radiative source term Sr along the y-axis located at x=0.02 m in the median plane of the combustion chamber; calculation with DOM-LC11 quadrature

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Radiative source term along the y-axis located at x=0.02 m in the median plane of the combustion chamber; calculation with DOM-S4 quadrature, DOM-LC11 quadrature, and MCM

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Temperature profile along the y-axis located at x=0.02m in the median plane of the combustion chamber

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Radiative species molar fractions profiles along the y-axis located at x=0.02m in the median plane of the combustion chamber

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In