0
Research Papers: Heat Transfer Enhancement

Characterization and Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Studies of Nanofluids

[+] Author and Article Information
R. Kathiravan, Akhilesh Gupta

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667, India

Ravi Kumar

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667, Indiaravikfme@iitr.ernet.in

Ramesh Chandra

Institute Instrumentation Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667, India

J. Heat Transfer 131(8), 081902 (Jun 05, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3111260 History: Received October 06, 2008; Revised March 04, 2009; Published June 05, 2009

Copper nanoparticles with an average size of 10 nm are prepared by the sputtering method and are characterized using different techniques, viz., X-ray diffraction spectrum, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The pool boiling heat transfer characteristics of 0.25%, 0.5%, and 1.0% by weight concentrations of copper nanoparticles dispersed in distilled water and in distilled water with 9.0wt% of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) are studied. Also the data for the boiling of pure distilled water and water with SDS are acquired. The above data are obtained using commercial seamless stainless steel tube heater with an outer diameter of 9.0 mm and an average surface roughness of 1.09μm. The experimental results concluded that (i) critical heat flux (CHF) obtained in water with surfactant nanofluids gives nearly one-third of the CHF obtained by copper-water nanofluids, (ii) pool boiling heat transfer coefficient decreases with the increase in the concentration of nanoparticles in water base fluids, and (iii) heat transfer coefficient increases with the addition of 9.0% surfactant in water. Further addition of nanoparticles in this mixture reduces the heat transfer coefficient. (iv) CHF increases nearly 50% with an increase in concentration of nanoparticles in the water as base fluid and nearly 60% in the water with surfactant as base fluid.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Variation in intensity with angle of diffraction

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

(a) AFM picture of copper nanoparticles and (b) variation in particle size with percentage volume

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

TEM photographs of water-copper nanofluid: (a) dispersion of copper particles in water and (b) diffraction pattern

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Variation in thermal conductivity ratio with concentration of nanoparticles

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Pool boiling experimental setup

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Schematic of the heater tube

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Graph between experimental heat transfer coefficients with predicted heat transfer coefficient

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Variation in heat flux with wall superheat

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Variation in heat flux with heat transfer coefficient

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Increase in critical heat flux with concentration of nanoparticles

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Comparison of nanofluids with pure water and water with surfactant

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Comparison between heat flux and heat transfer coefficient of nanofluids with pure water and water with surfactant

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Surface roughness of the heater: (a) before boiling and (b) after boiling

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In