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Research Papers: Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer

Thermal Analysis of a Water-Filled Micro Heat Pipe With Phase-Change Interfacial Resistance

[+] Author and Article Information
Yew Mun Hung

School of Engineering,  Monash University, 46150 Bandar Sunway, Malaysiahung.yew.mun@monash.edu

Kek-Kiong Tio

Faculty of Engineering and Technology  Multimedia University, 75450 Melaka, Malaysiakktio@mmu.edu.my

J. Heat Transfer 134(11), 112901 (Sep 28, 2012) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006898 History: Received September 01, 2011; Revised May 11, 2012; Published September 26, 2012; Online September 28, 2012

The progressive evaporation and condensation processes in a micro heat pipe, with which high heat fluxes at the liquid–vapor interface are associated, render it a device of high thermal conductance. By coupling the phase-change interfacial resistance model with a mathematical model based on first principles for fluid flow and heat transfer, the axial temperature variations of the liquid and vapor phases as well as those of other field variables are characterized and analyzed. The findings provide a well-defined exposition of the validity of uniform-temperature assumption for the liquid and vapor phases in the analysis of micro heat pipes. In conjunction with the acquisition of liquid and vapor temperature profiles, the heat transfer characteristics of the evaporation process can be analyzed. The local evaporative heat transfer coefficient and heat flux are evaluated. The results indicate that both heat transfer coefficient and heat flux are of considerably high values, confirming that the heat transport capability of a micro heat pipe is dominated by the phase-change heat transfer at the liquid–vapor interface.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 11

Liquid film geometry with area of AOB filled by liquid

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Figure 10

Average evaporative heat flux and heat transfer coefficient across the liquid–vapor interface (a) as a function of operating temperature and (b) as a function of contact angle for a copper–water micro heat pipe optimally operated at 60 °C

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Figure 9

(a) Local evaporative heat flux and heat transfer coefficient across the liquid–vapor interface, and (b) local central film thickness for a copper–water micro heat pipe optimally operated at 60 °C

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Figure 8

(a) Liquid and vapor axial temperature drops as a function of operating temperature in an optimally charged copper–water micro heat pipe. (b) Fractional temperature drops of the working fluid with respect to that of the solid wall as a function of operating temperature for an optimally charged copper–water micro heat pipe.

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Figure 7

(a) Solid, liquid, and vapor temperature profiles for a copper–water micro heat pipe optimally operated at 60 °C. (b) A magnification of the liquid and vapor temperature profiles.

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Figure 6

Liquid and vapor pressure profiles for a copper–water micro heat pipe optimally operated at 60 °C. The corresponding capillary pressure variation is included.

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Figure 5

(a) Profiles of mass flow rate of a micro heat pipe operated optimally at different temperatures. (b) Plots of maximum mass flow rate and average mass flow rate as a function of heat transport capacity.

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Figure 4

Liquid and vapor velocity profiles for a copper–water micro heat pipe optimally operated at 60 °C

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Figure 3

Meniscus radius of curvature and liquid volume fraction profiles for a copper–water micro heat pipe optimally operated at 60 °C

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Figure 2

(a) Heat transport capacity as a function of operating temperature for different values of contact angle. Experimental data from Babin [2] are included for comparison. (b) Heat transport capacity as a function of contact angle for different operating temperatures.

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Figure 1

A schematic diagram of an optimally charged micro heat pipe

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