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Research Papers: Jets, Wakes, and Impingment Cooling

Effect of Inclination Angle and Flow Rate on the Heat Transfer During Bottom Jet Cooling of a Steel Plate

[+] Author and Article Information
Noel L. Chester, Vladan Prodanovic

Centre for Metallurgical Process Engineering,
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada

Mary A. Wells

Department of Mechanical and
Mechatronics Engineering,
University of Waterloo,
Waterloo, ON, N2L 5B8, Canada
e-mail: mawells@uwaterloo.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received August 18, 2009; final manuscript received May 3, 2012; published online October 5, 2012. Assoc. Editor: Wilson K. S. Chiu.

J. Heat Transfer 134(12), 122201 (Oct 05, 2012) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007127 History: Received August 18, 2009; Revised May 03, 2012

The heat transfer that occurs during bottom water jet impingement on a hot steel plate has been investigated in terms of the effect inclination angle and flow rate. This research was carried out to develop quantitative knowledge of the heat transfer, which occurs on the runout table, a crucial component in the hot rolling production of advanced high strength steels. Industrially produced hot-rolled steel samples were instrumented with numerous subsurface thermocouples installed close to the quench surface. The experimental measurements were used in conjunction with an inverse heat conduction (IHC) model to quantify boiling characteristics as well as heat extraction histories for the different nozzle inclination angles and flow rates. It was found that, as nozzle inclination angle increased, the degree of asymmetry of the cooled region on the surface of the sample was increased and the overall rate of heat extraction decreased. The angle of inclination had a significant effect on overall heat extraction; a vertical nozzle was the most efficient from a perspective of heat transfer under the nozzle. As expected, as flow rates increased, the amount of heat energy extracted increased for all the conditions studied, regardless of the nozzle inclination.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Different boiling regions present during bottom jet impingement

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Fig. 2

Schematic of the ROT, highlighting the bottom jet cooling system

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Fig. 3

Top view and side view of the test plate, showing the thermocouple locations and stand-off distance of the nozzle from the plate

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Fig. 4

Typical video images taken during a quench experiment, showing the progression of the wetting front at (a) 0.0333 s, (b) 0.267 s, and (c) 1.333 s

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Fig. 5

Schematic of the 2D plate geometry used in the IHC model for (a) forward and reverse flow direction and (b) lateral flow direction

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Fig. 6

Comparison of wetting front radial position estimate based on the second order derivative method using the measured thermal data and video images. The experimental conditions used for this test were 35 l/min water flow rate and 20 deg nozzle inclination in the lateral flow direction.

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Fig. 7

Calculated heat fluxes for stationary experiment with 55 l/min flow rate and 30 deg inclination in the forward flow direction

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Fig. 8

Boiling curve outside impingement zone at 32 mm from jet centerline in the lateral flow direction from an experiment with 45 l/min and 20 deg inclination

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Fig. 9

Effect of inclination angle on the symmetry of the surface temperature profile at 2 s after turning on the jet at 45 l/min and (a) 0 deg, (b) 10 deg, (c) 20 deg, and (d) 30 deg inclination

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Fig. 10

Effect of inclination angle on the symmetry of the surface temperature profile at 2 s after turning on the jet at 45 l/min and (a) 0 deg, (b) 10 deg, (c) 20 deg, and (d) 30 deg inclination

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Fig. 11

Two-dimensional wetting front progression over time taken from stationary experiments at 45 l/min flow rate and showing (a) 0 deg [19], (b) 10 deg, (c) 20 deg, and (d) 30 deg

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Fig. 12

Effect of inclination angle on the calculated heat removal during cooling, showing time up to (a) 45 s and (b) 5 s after impingement

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Fig. 13

Effect of water flow rate on the calculated heat removal up to 20 s of cooling at an inclination angle of 10 deg

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Fig. 14

Calculated overall energy dissipation versus flow rate after 10 s

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