0
Research Papers: Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer

Microchannel Two-Phase Flow Oscillation Control With an Adjustable Inlet Orifice

[+] Author and Article Information
Brent A. Odom

e-mail: brentodom@hotmail.com

Patrick E. Phelan

School for Engineering of Matter,
Transport, and Energy,
Arizona State University,
Engineering G-Wing,
501 E. Tyler Mall,
Tempe, AZ 85281

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received September 7, 2011; final manuscript received July 3, 2012; published online October 5, 2012. Assoc. Editor: W. Q. Tao.

J. Heat Transfer 134(12), 122901 (Oct 05, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4007202 History: Received September 07, 2011; Revised July 03, 2012

This work describes the experimental setup, method, and results of utilizing a micrometer to move an adjustable orifice immediately in front of an array of microchannels. Research by others indicates potential for significant improvement in delaying critical heat flux and increasing heat transfer coefficients when placing an orifice in front of each individual channel of a microchannel array. The experimental setup in this work allows incremental orifice size changes. This ability allows the experimentalist to find which orifice size provides enough pressure drop immediately in front of the channels to reduce oscillations. The design also allows for rapid change of orifice size without having to remove and replace any components of the test setup. Signal analysis methods were used to identify frequency and amplitude of pressure and temperature oscillations. Low mass flux experiments (300 kg m−2 s−1 and 600 kg m−2 s−1 of R134a in a pumped loop) showed reduced channel wall temperatures with smaller orifice sizes. The orifice concept was found to be effective at reducing oscillations for the higher 600 kg m−2 s−1 flow rate, but the data indicate that wall temperature reduction with inlet orifice use is not solely due to elimination of oscillations. Signal analysis was an effective method of identifying oscillations without the availability of pictorial representation of flow patterns in the channels.

Copyright © 2012 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Bergles, A. E., and Kandlikar, S. G., 2005, “On the Nature of Critical Heat Flux in Microchannels,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 127, pp. 101–107. [CrossRef]
Kuan, W. K., and Kandlikar, S. G., 2006, “Experimental Study on the Effect of Stabilization on Flow Boiling Heat Transfer in Microchannels,” Proceedings of 4th International Conference on Nanochannels, Microchannels and Minichannels, Limerick, Ireland, pp. 53–60, ASME Paper No. ICNMM2006-96045. [CrossRef]
Park, J. E., Thome, J. R., and Michel, B., 2009, “Effect of Inlet Orifice on Saturated CHF and Flow Visualization in Multi-Microchannel Heat Sinks,” Proceedings of 25th Annual IEEE Semiconductor Thermal Measurement and Management Symposium, San Jose, CA, Mar. 15–19, pp. 1–8.
Koşar, A., Kuo, C., and Peles, Y., 2006, “Suppression of Boiling Flow Oscillations in Parallel Microchannels by Inlet Restrictors,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 128, pp. 251–260. [CrossRef]
Boure, J. A., Bergles, A. E., and Tong, L. S., 1973, “Review of Two-Phase Flow Instability,” Nucl. Eng. Des., 25, pp. 165–192. [CrossRef]
Kandlikar, S. G., Kuan, W. K., Willistein, D. A., and Borrelli, J., 2006, “Stabilization of Flow Boiling in Microchannels Using Pressure Drop Elements and Fabricated Nucleation Sites,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 128, pp. 389–396. [CrossRef]
Xu, J., Liu, G., Zhang, W., Li, Q., and Wang, B., 2009, “Seed Bubbles Stabilize Flow and Heat Transfer in Parallel Microchannels,” Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 35, pp. 773–790. [CrossRef]
Bhide, R. R., Singh, S. G., Sridharan, A., and Agrawal, A., 2011, “An Active Control Strategy for Reduction of Pressure Instabilities During Flow Boiling in a Microchannel,” J. Micromech. Microeng., 21, p. 035021. [CrossRef]
Wang, G., Cheng, P., and Bergles, A. E., 2008, “Effects of Inlet/Outlet Configurations on Flow Boiling Instability in Parallel Microchannels,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 51, pp. 2267–2281. [CrossRef]
Lu, C. T., and Pan, C., 2008, “Stabilization of Flow Boiling in Microchannel Heat Sinks With a Diverging Cross-Section Design,” J. Micromech. Microeng., 18, p. 075035. [CrossRef]
Phelan, P. E., Gupta, Y., Tyagi, H., Prasher, R. S., Cattano, J., Michna, G., Zhou, R., Wen, J., Jensen, M., and Peles, Y., 2010, “Energy Efficiency of Refrigeration Systems for High-Heat-Flux Microelectronics,” ASME J. Therm. Sci. Eng. Appl., 2, p. 031004. [CrossRef]
Beckwith, T. G., Marangoni, R. D., and LienhardV, J. H., 1993, Mechanical Measurements, 5th ed., Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Reading, pp. 183–184, Chap. 5.
Lynn, P. A., 1998, Introductory Digital Signal Processing With Computer Applications, John Wiley & Sons, New York, pp. 149–153, Chap. 5.
Lee, J., and Mudawar, I., 2005, “Two-Phase Flow in High-Heat-Flux Micro-Channel Heat Sink for Refrigeration Cooling Applications: Part II—Heat Transfer Characteristics,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 48, pp. 941–955. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Cooling loop schematic

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Adjustable orifice concept sketch (not to scale)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Micrometer and steel plate (a), cover and dam (b), top block (c), microchannels (d), dam (e), assembly (f), copper heating block (g)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Average of 2 min of data for different orifice sizes under steady-state conditions, 300 kg m-2 s-1 mass flux, and heat flux = 178 W cm-2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Average of 2 min of data for different orifice sizes under steady-state conditions, 600 kg m-2 s-1 mass flux, and heat flux = 337 W cm-2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig.  6

Representative time domain comparison for 300 kg m-2 s-1 mass flux

Grahic Jump Location
Fig.  7

Representative time domain comparison for 600 kg m-2 s-1 mass flux

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Inlet pressure FFT results, 300 kg m-2 s-1 mass flux, heat flux = 178 W cm-2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Outlet wall temperature FFT results, 300 kg m-2 s-1 mass flux, heat flux = 178 W cm-2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Inlet wall temperature FFT results, 300 kg m-2 s-1 mass flux, heat flux = 178 W cm-2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Inlet pressure FFT results, 600 kg m-2 s-1 mass flux, heat flux = 337 W cm-2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Outlet wall temperature FFT results, 600 kg m-2 s-1 mass flux, heat flux = 337 W cm-2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Inlet wall temperature FFT results, 600 kg m-2 s-1 mass flux, heat flux = 337 W cm-2

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Average of 2 min of data for different orifice sizes, steady-state conditions, 300 kg m-2 s-1 mass flux, and heat flux = 178 W cm-2. Both inlet and outlet conditions were a saturated liquid–vapor mixture.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 15

Average of 2 min of data for different orifice sizes, steady-state conditions, 600 kg m-2 s-1 mass flux, and heat flux = 337 W cm-2. Inlet conditions were slightly subcooled while outlet conditions were a saturated liquid–vapor mixture.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In