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Research Papers: Heat Transfer in Manufacturing

Experimental Investigation of Effect of a Surfactant to Increase Cooling of Hot Steel Plates by a Water Jet

[+] Author and Article Information
Ankur Verma

Department of Chemical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Kharagpur 721302, India

Surjya K. Pal

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Kharagpur 721302, India

Sudipto Chakraborty

Department of Chemical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Kharagpur 721302, India
e-mail: sc@che.iitkgp.ernet.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received September 14, 2011; final manuscript received August 15, 2012; published online February 8, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Wei Tong.

J. Heat Transfer 135(3), 032101 (Feb 08, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: HT-11-1443; doi: 10.1115/1.4007878 History: Received September 14, 2011; Revised August 15, 2012

The requirement for high tensile strength steel has placed greater emphasis on the cooling methods used in the cooling of a hot steel plate. The purpose of this research is to study the effect of surfactant concentration in water jet cooling, and its applicability in the study of ultrafast cooling (UFC) of a hot steel plate. The initial temperature of the plate, before the cooling starts, is kept at 900 °C which is usually observed as the “finish rolling temperature (FRT)” in the hot strip mill of a steel plant. The current heat transfer analysis shows that surfactant added water jet produces higher heat flux than the pure water jet due to the higher forced convection cooling area. Dissolved surfactant increases the transition boiling heat flux, nucleate boiling heat flux and critical heat flux. At a concentration of 600 ppm, the maximum surface heat flux has been observed and further increase in surfactant concentration decreases the surface heat flux. The surface heat flux and the cooling rate show an increasing trend with the increasing water flow rate at a constant surfactant concentration. The achieved cooling rate in case of surfactant added water is almost twice that of jet with pure water, resulting in ultrafast cooling. By assuming the impinging surface consists of three different constant heat flux regions, the surface heat flux and the surface temperatures have been calculated by using intemp software.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Sketch of experimental setup

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Fig. 2

Computational domain for the steel plate for intemp

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Fig. 3

Surface tension of water at various surfactant concentrations

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Fig. 4

Variation of temperature at different locations during pure water jet cooling

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Fig. 5

Variation of temperature at different depths during water jet with surfactant

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Fig. 6

(a) Calculated surface heat flux at different locations as a function of time for water jet without surfactant. (b) Calculated surface temperature at different locations as a function of time for water jet without surfactant.

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Fig. 7

(a) Calculated surface heat flux at different locations as a function of time for water jet with surfactant. (b) Calculated surface temperature at different locations as a function of time for water jet with surfactant.

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Fig. 8

Variations of local surface temperature with position

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Fig. 9

Average heat flux as a function of surface temperature

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Fig. 10

Average surface heat flux variation with concentration of surfactant at different water flow rates

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Fig. 11

Surface cooling rate variation with concentration of surfactant at different water flow rates

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Fig. 12

Visual observation of water jet without surfactant (a) and (b) water jet with surfactant

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Fig. 13

Validation of estimated temperatures with the measured

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