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Research Papers: Porous Media

Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop of Lotus-Type Porous Metals

[+] Author and Article Information
Kenshiro Muramatsu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Stanford University,
Stanford, CA 94305
e-mail: kenshiro@stanford.edu

Hideo Nakajima

The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research,
Osaka University,
8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki,
Osaka 567-0047, Japan

John K. Eaton

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Stanford University,
Stanford, CA 94305

1Present address: Denso Corporation, 1-1 Showa-cho, Kariya, Aichi 448-8661, Japan. e-mail: kenshiro_muramatsu@denso.co.jp

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received May 23, 2012; final manuscript received January 24, 2013; published online June 6, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Wilson K. S. Chiu.

J. Heat Transfer 135(7), 072601 (Jun 06, 2013) (9 pages) Paper No: HT-12-1242; doi: 10.1115/1.4023564 History: Received May 23, 2012; Revised January 24, 2013

Metal foams are of interest for heat transfer applications because of their high surface-to-volume ratio and high convective heat transfer coefficients. However, conventional open-cell foams have high pressure drop and low net thermal conductivity in the direction normal to a heated surface due to the fully random structure. This paper examines heat transfer elements made by stacking thin layers of lotus metal which have many small pores aligned in the flow direction. The reduction in randomness reduces the pressure drop and increases the thermal conduction compared to conventional metal foams. Experimental results are presented for the heat transfer performance of two types of lotus metal fins, one with a deterministic pattern of machined holes and one with a random hole pattern made by a continuous casting technique. The layer spacing, the hole diameter, the porosity, and the flow Reynolds number were all varied. The measurements show that spacing between fin layers and the relative alignment of pores in successive fins can have a substantial effect on the heat transfer performance.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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Figures

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Fig. 1

Outer appearance of lotus-type porous metals. (a) Machined deterministic hole pattern fin, dp = 0.55 mm, φ = 0.59. (b) Random hole pattern fin made by continuous casting technique, dp_mean = 0.71 mm, φopen = 0.39, φweight = 0.60.

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Fig. 2

Configuration of lotus-type metal fins

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Fig. 3

Relative alignment of pores in successive fins for (a) staggered and (b) inline

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Fig. 4

Inlet and test section of transient periodic test

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Fig. 5

Test section air supply

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Fig. 6

Coldwire instrument schematic

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Fig. 7

Convective performance of fin type 1: hmAc per fin for (a) staggered and (b) inline (deterministic, dp = 0.55 mm, φ = 0.59)

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Fig. 8

Convective performance of fin type 2: hmAc per fin for (a) staggered and (b) inline (deterministic, dp = 0.53 mm, φ = 0.71)

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Fig. 9

Convective performance of fin type 3: hmAc per fin (random, dp_mean = 0.71 mm, φopen = 0.39, φweight = 0.60)

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Fig. 10

Convective performance of fin type 4: hmAc per fin (random, dp_mean = 0.25 mm, φopen = 0.28, φweight = 0.57)

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Fig. 11

Experimental and analytical convective performance of single fin

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Fig. 12

Pressure drop across fin type 1: Cp per fin for (a) staggered and (b) inline (deterministic, dp = 0.55 mm, φ = 0.59)

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Fig. 13

Pressure drop across fin type 2: Cp per fin for (a) staggered and (b) inline (deterministic, dp = 0.53 mm, φ = 0.71)

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Fig. 14

Pressure drop across fin type 3: Cp per fin (random, dp_mean = 0.71 mm, φopen = 0.39, φweight = 0.60)

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Fig. 15

Pressure drop across fin type 4: Cp per fin (random, dp_mean = 0.25 mm, φopen = 0.28, φweight = 0.57)

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Fig. 16

Convective performance per unit volume of fin type 1 as a function of a pumping power per unit volume

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Fig. 17

Comparison of convective performance between lotus-type porous metal and conventional metal foam

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Fig. 18

Thermal conductivity normal to pore axis

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