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Research Papers

Bio-Inspired Segmented Flow: Effect of Particle Elongation on the Heat Transfer

[+] Author and Article Information
Fatemeh Hassanipour

e-mail: fatemeh@utdallas.edu
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Texas at Dallas,
Richardson, TX 75080

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received November 23, 2011; final manuscript received November 9, 2012; published online June 21, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Franz-Josef Kahlen.

J. Heat Transfer 135(7), 071001 (Jun 21, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: HT-11-1531; doi: 10.1115/1.4024062 History: Received November 23, 2011; Revised November 09, 2012

This study presents numerical simulations of forced convection heat transfer with parachute-shaped segmented flow. The particles are encapsulated phase-change material flowing with water through a square cross-section duct with iso-flux boundaries. The system is inspired by the gas exchange process in the alveolar capillaries between red blood cells and lung tissue. A numerical model is developed for the motion of elongated encapsulated phase-change particles along a channel in a particulate flow where particle diameters are comparable with the channel height. The heat transfer enhancement for the parachute-shaped particles is compared with that of the spherical particles. Results reveal that the snug movement of the particles has the key role in heat transfer efficiency. The parachute-shaped geometry produces small changes in the heat transfer coefficient compared to a spherical geometry. However, the parachute-shaped particle flow is more robust to changes in particle concentration inside the channel.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Gas exchange by red blood cells in lung capillaries

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Fig. 2

Analogy between gas diffusion (top) and heat transfer (bottom)

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Fig. 3

Example of red blood cells elongation flowing through capillaries [12]

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Fig. 4

Schematic of domain for the numerical simulations

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Fig. 5

Schematic of particle configuration for the numerical simulations

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Fig. 6

Representative grid interval size accuracy test q" = 30 kw/m2, u = 0.03 m/s, and ϕ = 4.5%

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Fig. 7

Representative time interval size accuracy test q" = 30 kw/m2, u = 0.03 m/s, and ϕ = 4%

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Fig. 8

Effect of particle shape on the heat transfer coefficient q" = 10 kw/m2, u = 0.01 m/s, and ϕ = 14%

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Fig. 9

Effect of particle shape on the heat transfer coefficient for q" = 30 kw/m2, u = 0.01 m/s, and ϕ = 14%

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Fig. 10

Flow velocity distribution within the channel with spherical shaped particles (a) ϕ = 4%, (b) ϕ = 14%, and (c) ϕ = 28% [21]

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Fig. 11

Flow velocity distribution within the channel with parachute-shaped particles (a) ϕ = 4%, (b) ϕ = 14%, and (c) ϕ = 28%

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Fig. 12

Effect of spherical particle concentration on the heat transfer coefficient q" = 10 kw/m2, u = 0.01 m/s

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Fig. 13

Effect of parachute particle concentration on the heat transfer coefficient q" = 10 kw/m2, u = 0.01 m/s

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Fig. 14

Effect of spherical particle concentration on the heat transfer coefficient q" = 30 kw/m2, u = 0.01 m/s

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Fig. 15

Effect of parachute particle concentration on the heat transfer coefficient q" = 30 kw/m2, u = 0.01 m/s

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Fig. 16

Liquid fraction and melting time in spherical versus parachute particles u = 0.01 m/s and q" = 30 kw/m2

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Fig. 17

Liquid fraction and melting time for parachute particles in different flow velocity ϕ = 4% and q" = 30 kw/m2

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