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Research Papers: Forced Convection

Forced Heat and Mass Transfer From a Slightly Deformed Sphere at Small but Finite Peclet Numbers in Stokes Flow

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhi-Gang Feng

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Texas at San Antonio,
San Antonio, TX 78259
e-mail: zhigang.feng@utsa.edu

1Corresponding author, also an adjunct professor of Changzhou University, China.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Heat Transfer. Manuscript received October 11, 2012; final manuscript received February 25, 2013; published online July 11, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Wilson K. S. Chiu.

J. Heat Transfer 135(8), 081702 (Jul 11, 2013) (8 pages) Paper No: HT-12-1554; doi: 10.1115/1.4023937 History: Received October 11, 2012; Revised February 25, 2013

The fundamental problem of heat and mass transfer from a slightly deformed sphere at low but finite Peclet numbers in Stokes flow is solved by a combined regular and singular perturbation method. The deformed sphere is assumed to be axisymmetric and its shape is described by a power series in a small parameter; the correction to the Nusselt number due to the deformation of the sphere is obtained through a regular perturbation with respect to this parameter. On the contrary, the correction to the Nusselt number due to the small Peclet number is derived by applying a singular perturbation method. The analytical solution is derived for the averaged Nusselt number in terms of the Peclet number and the deformation parameter.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Nusselt number versus Peclet number for ɛ = -0.2 (prolate), ɛ = 0 (sphere), and ɛ = 0.2 (oblate)

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