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Research Papers

Pool Boiling Heat Transfer of Borated (H3BO3) Water on a Nanoporous Surface

[+] Author and Article Information
Sang M. Kwark

e-mail: sangkwark@gmail.com

Seung M. You

Mechanical and Aerospace
Engineering Department,
The University of Texas at Arlington,
500 W. First Street,
Arlington, TX 76019

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received May 31, 2012; final manuscript received March 15, 2013; published online July 26, 2013. Guest Editors: G. P. “Bud” Peterson and Zhuomin Zhang.

J. Heat Transfer 135(9), 091302 (Jul 26, 2013) (8 pages) Paper No: HT-12-1263; doi: 10.1115/1.4024422 History: Received May 31, 2012; Revised March 15, 2013

With regard to potential application in pressurized water reactors (PWRs), a nanoporous heated surface was tested in pool boiling of an aqueous solution of boric acid (H3BO3), or borated water (1% volume concentration). The effect of system pressure and surface orientation on pool boiling heat transfer (BHT) was studied. The nanoporous surface consisted of a coating of alumina nanoparticles applied on a 1 cm2 flat copper surface through nanofluid boiling. An uncoated surface in borated water was similarly tested, and due to boric acid deposition, the BHT degraded and the critical heat flux (CHF) enhanced relative to pure water. Also, the possibility of transient pool boiling behavior of borated water was investigated but none was detected. With pressure and orientation variation, the nanoporous surface imposed on borated water showed a trend of further CHF enhancement to the CHF limit produced by the nanoporous surface in pure water. Over the nanoporous surface, the CHF of borated water was increasingly better with decreasing pressure, than that over the plain surface. However, BHT degraded slightly further. Boric acid deposition over the nanoporous surface was believed to be the source of this BHT degradation, but played no apparent role in the further CHF enhancement.

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Figures

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Fig. 3

Nontransient behavior of borated water (1% vol.) pool boiling with the plain surface demonstrated by repeated tests

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Fig. 2

SEM images of the plain surface (a) and nanoporous coating (b) developed in 1 g/l ethanol-based nanofluid for 2 min. at 500 kW/m2

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Fig. 1

Schematics of (a) test facility and (b) test heater assembly

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Fig. 4

Effect of pressure on the pool boiling curve of (a) plain and (b) nanoporous surfaces with pure water and borated water (1% vol.)

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Fig. 5

CHF enhancement, defined as the ratio of obtained CHF to predicted CHF in pure water by Zuber's [39] correlation, for plain and nanoporous surfaces, with pure and borated water (1% vol.), at various pressures

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Fig. 6

Effect of orientation angle of the plain surface on the pool boiling curves of (a) pure water and (b) borated water (1% vol.)

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Fig. 7

(a) CHF enhancement, defined as the ratio of obtained CHF to predicted CHF in pure water by Zuber's [39] correlation, and (b) relative CHF enhancement, defined as the ratio of CHF in borated water to CHF in pure water, for borated water (1% vol.) using the plain surface at various orientations

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Fig. 8

Effect of orientation angle of the nanoporous surface on the pool boiling curves of (a) pure water and (b) borated water (1% vol.)

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Fig. 9

(a) CHF enhancement, defined as the ratio of obtained CHF to predicted CHF in pure water by Zuber's [39] correlation, and (b) relative CHF enhancement, defined as the ratio of CHF in borated water to CHF in pure water, for borated water (1% vol.) using the nanoporous surface at various orientations

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