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Research Papers

Investigation of Heat Transfer in Evaporator of Microchannel Loop Heat Pipe

[+] Author and Article Information
Alexander A. Yakomaskin

e-mail: yak40@gmx.com

Valery N. Afanasiev


Department of Thermophysics,
Bauman Moscow State Technical University,
2nd Baumanskaya Street, 5,
Moscow 105005, Russia

Nikolay N. Zubkov

Department of Tool Engineering
and Technologies,
Bauman Moscow State Technical University,
2nd Baumanskaya Street, 5,
Moscow 105005, Russia

Dmitry N. Morskoy

Department of Thermophysics,
Bauman Moscow State Technical University,
2nd Baumanskaya Street, 5,
Moscow 105005, Russia

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Heat Transfer. Manuscript received July 8, 2012; final manuscript received March 14, 2013; published online September 11, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Roy E. Hogan.

J. Heat Transfer 135(10), 101006 (Sep 11, 2013) (7 pages) Paper No: HT-12-1358; doi: 10.1115/1.4024502 History: Received July 08, 2012; Revised March 14, 2013

Loop heat pipes (LHP) are heat transfer devices which use evaporation and condensation of working fluid to transfer heat and use capillary forces to provide fluid circulation in a closed loop. One of the main applications of LHP is cooling of electronic components. Further development of this field is associated with miniaturization. Thus, there are strict limits imposed upon size of elements of heat transfer devices in electronics cooling. One of such elements is an evaporator of the LHP, its main element. This paper deals with the LHP evaporator and is aimed at showing dependence of wick conductivity, thickness, and vapor flow geometry on overall heat transfer performance. An open loop experimental setup was created. Experiments were carried out with various configurations. The evaporator consisted of a microchannel (MC) plate, with groove widths of 100 and 300 μm, wick (metal and nonmetal porous materials were used) and a compensation chamber (CC). Heat load varied from 20 to 140 W in steps of 20 W. The area of the heater was equal to 19 × 19 mm2. The working fluid is de-ionized water. Experimental results include data on temperature distribution across the wick's height, temperature of microchannel's surface, and temperature of water in the compensation chamber. The results reveal a potential for performing optimization of the zone of evaporation in order to produce thinner LHP evaporators.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 3

Flat thermocouple TC3 on the top of the wick

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Fig. 2

The experimental scheme: V1, V2, valves; Tr, transformer; P, pressure transducer; W, power meter; TC1–TC4, thermocouples; ΔH, level difference; R, reservoir; B, buffer

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Fig. 1

Assembly of evaporator: 1, base; 2, insulation plate; 3, heater; 4, microchannel plate; 5, wick; 6, perforated plate; 7, paper gasket; 8, compensation chamber; 9, vacuum rubber gasket; 10, cross-shaped part

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Fig. 4

Section of the microchannels (also see Table 2)

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Fig. 5

Heater surface temperature TC1 versus heat load for MC1 for different wick materials

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Fig. 12

Deformational cutting examples: (a), tube finning; (b), typical fin cross section; (c) pinned surface; (d) inside tube enhancement; (e) mesh of metal sheet; and (f) surface for pool boiling

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Fig. 10

Start-up characteristics for MC1 at Q = 20 W

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Fig. 6

Heater surface temperature TC1 versus heat load for MC2 for different wick materials

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Fig. 7

Heater surface temperature TC1 versus heat load for GF b = 0.4 for MC1 and MC2

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Fig. 8

Heater surface temperature versus heat load for SS b = 2.5 for MC1 and MC2

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Fig. 9

Temperature difference between heater surface and absorbing side of wick versus heat load for MC1 (ΔT = TC1 − TC3)

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Fig. 11

Deformational cutting method: 1, workpiece; 2, tool; 3, fins; 4, primary motion; 5, feed motion

Tables

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