0
Research Papers: Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer

Experimental Study of Linear and Radial Two-Phase Heat Transport Devices Driven by Electrohydrodynamic Conduction Pumping

[+] Author and Article Information
Matthew R. Pearson

Thermal Fluid Sciences Department,
United Technologies Research Center,
East Hartford, CT 06108
e-mail: pearsomr@utrc.utc.com

Jamal Seyed-Yagoobi

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Worcester Polytechnic Institute,
Worcester, MA 01609
e-mail: jyagoobi@wpi.edu

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Heat Transfer. Manuscript received June 17, 2012; final manuscript received September 5, 2013; published online November 25, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Sujoy Kumar Saha.

J. Heat Transfer 137(2), 022901 (Feb 01, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: HT-12-1292; doi: 10.1115/1.4025430 History: Received June 17, 2012; Revised September 05, 2013; Online November 25, 2014

Heat pipes are well known as simple and effective heat transport devices, utilizing two-phase flow and the capillary phenomenon to remove heat. However, the generation of capillary pressure requires a wicking structure and the overall heat transport capacity of the heat pipe is generally limited by the amount of capillary pressure generation that the wicking structure can achieve. Therefore, to increase the heat transport capacity, the capillary phenomenon must be either augmented or replaced by some other pumping technique. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) conduction pumping can be readily used to pump a thin film of a dielectric liquid along a surface, using electrodes that are embedded into the surface. In this study, two two-phase heat transport devices are created. The first device transports the heat in a linear direction. The second device transports the heat in a radial direction from a central heat source. The radial pumping configuration provides several advantages. Most notably, the heat source is wetted with fresh liquid from all directions, thereby reducing the amount of distance that must be travelled by the working fluid. The power required to operate the EHD conduction pumps is a trivial amount relative to the heat that is transported.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Peterson, G. P., 1994, An Introduction to Heat Pipes: Modeling, Testing, and Applications, Wiley, New York.
Pearson, M. R., and Seyed-Yagoobi, J., 2009, “Advances in Electrohydrodynamic Conduction Pumping,” IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul., 16(2), pp. 424–434. [CrossRef]
Jones, T. B., 1974, “An Electrohydrodynamic Heat Pipe,” Mech. Eng., 96(1), pp. 27–32.
Jones, T. B., and Perry, M. P., 1974, “Electrohydrodynamic Heat Pipe Experiments,” J. Appl. Phys., 45(5), pp. 2129–2132. [CrossRef]
Loehrke, R. I., and Debs, R. J., 1975, “Measurement of the Performance of an Electrohydrodynamic Heat Pipe,” AIAA Paper No. 75-659.
Bologa, M. K., and Savin, I. K., 1990, “Electrohydrodynamic Heat Pipes,” Proceedings of the 7th International Heat Pipe Conference, Minsk, pp. 549–562.
Babin, B. R., Peterson, G. P., and Seyed-Yagoobi, J., 1993, “Experimental Investigation of an Ion-Drag Pump Assisted Heat Pipe,” J. Thermophys. Heat Transfer, 7(2), pp. 340–345. [CrossRef]
Bryan, J. E., and Seyed-Yagoobi, J., 1997, “Heat Transport Enhancement of Monogroove Heat Pipe With Electrohydrodynamic Pumping,” J. Thermophys. Heat Transfer, 11(3), pp. 454–460. [CrossRef]
Atten, P., and Seyed-Yagoobi, J., 2003, “Electrohydrodynamically Induced Dielectric Liquid Flow Through Pure Conduction in Point/Plane Geometry,” IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul., 10(1), pp. 27–36. [CrossRef]
Jeong, S.-I., and Seyed-Yagoobi, J., 2002, “Performance Enhancement of a Monogroove Heat Pipe With Electrohydrodynamic Conduction Pumping,” Proceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, New Orleans, LA.
Jeong, S.-I., and Didion, J., 2007, “Thermal Control Utilizing an Electro-Hydrodynamic Conduction Pump in a Two-Phase Loop With High Heat Flux Source,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 129(11), pp. 1576–1583. [CrossRef]
Jeong, S.-I., and Didion, J., 2008, “Performance Characteristics of Electrohydrodynamic Conduction Pump in Two-Phase Loops,” J. Thermophys. Heat Transfer, 22(1), pp. 90–97. [CrossRef]
Yazdani, M., and Seyed-Yagoobi, J., 2009, “Electrically Induced Dielectric Liquid Film Flow Based on Electric Conduction Phenomenon,” IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul., 16(3), pp. 768–777. [CrossRef]
Yazdani, M., and Seyed-Yagoobi, J., 2009, “Numerical Investigation of EHD Conduction Pumping of Liquid Film in the Presence of Evaporation,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 131, p. 011602. [CrossRef]
Siddiqui, M. A. W., and Seyed-Yagoobi, J., 2009, “Experimental Study of Pumping of Liquid Film With Electric Conduction Pumping,” IEEE Trans. Ind. Appl., 45(1), pp. 3–9. [CrossRef]
Seyed-Yagoobi, J., 2005, “Electrohydrodynamic Pumping of Dielectric Liquids,” J. Electrostat., 63(6–10), pp. 861–869. [CrossRef]
Mudawwar, I. A., Incropera, T. A., and Incropera, F. P., 1987, “Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical Heat Flux in Liquid Films Falling on Vertically-Mounted Heat Sources,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 30(10), pp. 2083–2095. [CrossRef]
Ueda, T., Inoue, M., and Nagatome, S., 1981, “Critical Heat Flux and Droplet Entrainment Rate in Boiling of Falling Liquid Films,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 24(7), pp. 1257–1266. [CrossRef]
Mesler, R., 1979, “Nucleate Boiling in Thin Liquid Films,” Boiling Phenomena, Vol. 2, Hemisphere Publishing Corporation, Washington, DC, pp. 813–819.
DuPont Fluorochemicals, 1998, “DuPont HCFC-123: Properties, Uses, Storage, and Handling.”

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Photograph of the two-phase heat transfer device

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Schematic of linear heat transport device

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Schematic of electrode dimensions and electrical connections

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Boiling curve for the 2 mm film, no tilt

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Boiling curve for the 4 mm film, no tilt

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Boiling curve for the 6 mm film, no tilt

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Boiling curve for the 4 mm film, 14 mm of adverse tilt

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Boiling curve for the 2 mm film, 9 mm of favorable tilt

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Conceptual drawing of radial heat transport device

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Simplified differential analysis of mass flow rate in a linear or radial heat transport device

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Photograph of assembled circular heat transport device

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Schematic of radial heat transport device

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 13

Radial heat transport device performance

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 14

Approximate mean film velocity of radially flowing film

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In