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Research Papers: Conduction

Numerical Simulation of Excimer Laser Cleaning of Film and Particle Contaminants

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Marimuthu, L. Li

Laser Processing Research Centre,
School of Mechanical, Aerospace
and Civil Engineering,
The University of Manchester,
Manchester M13 9PL, UK

I. S. Molchan, Z. Liu

Corrosion and Protection Centre,
School of Materials,
The University of Manchester,
Manchester M13 9PL, UK

Z. B. Wang

e-mail: z.wang@bangor.ac.uk

C. Grafton-Reed

Rolls-Royce plc,
P.O. Box 31,
Derby DE24 8BJ, UK

S. Dilworth

BAE Systems (Operations) Limited,
Farnborough,
Hants GU14 6YU, UK

1Present address: School of Mechanical and manufacturing, Loughborough University, UK.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received May 29, 2012; final manuscript received May 24, 2013; published online September 27, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Wilson K. S. Chiu.

J. Heat Transfer 135(12), 121301 (Sep 27, 2013) (12 pages) Paper No: HT-12-1254; doi: 10.1115/1.4024836 History: Received May 29, 2012; Revised May 24, 2013

Laser cleaning is a promising surface preparation technique for applications in high value manufacturing industries. However, understanding the effects of laser processing parameters on various types of contaminants and substrates, is vital to achieve the required cleaning efficacy and quality. In this paper, a two-dimensional transient numerical simulation was carried out to study the material ablation characteristics and substrate thermal effects in laser cleaning of aerospace alloys. Element birth and death method was employed to track the contaminant removal on the surface of the material. The result shows that contaminant ablation increases with laser power and number of pulses. The finite element method (FEM) model is capable enough to predict the optimum number of pulses and laser power required to remove various contaminants. Based on the simulation results, the mechanism of the excimer laser cleaning is proposed. Thus, the use of numerical simulation can be faster and cheaper method of establishing the optimum laser cleaning window and reducing the number of experimental tests.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Model domain and FEM mesh used for laser cleaning of flat contaminant layer (BC—means “boundary constraint”)

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Fig. 2

Strategy used for applying surface heat sources for various surface profiles

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Fig. 3

Flowchart explaining the analysis steps

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Fig. 4

Effect of laser peak power on temperature profile (K) and contaminant removal (contaminant type = yttria, number of pulse = 20)

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Fig. 5

Variation of maximum and minimum temperatures for various number of pulse (contaminant type = yttria)

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Fig. 6

Variation of temperature with depth and time (laser peak power = 30 MW, contaminant type = magnesium oxide, number of pulse = 20)

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Fig. 7

Variation of temperature with number of pulse (laser peak power = 15 MW, contaminant type = yttria)

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Fig. 8

Effect of contaminant types on temperature profile (K) and contaminant removal (laser peak power = 15 MW, number of pulse = 20)

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Fig. 9

Variation of temperature with number of pulses for various laser beam incident angles (laser peak power = 15 MW, contaminant type = hydraulic oil, number of pulse = 20)

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Fig. 10

Model domain and FEM mesh used for laser cleaning of contaminant layer with particles

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Fig. 11

Effect of laser peak power on temperature profile (K) and contaminant removal (contaminant type = yttria particle with grease layer, number of pulse = 20 and laser peak power: (a) = 10 MW, (b) = 15 MW, (c) = 30 MW, and (d) = 50 MW)

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Fig. 12

Effect of number of pulses on temperature profile (K) and contaminant removal (contaminant type = yttria particle with grease layer, laser peak power= 30 MW and number of pulse: (a) = 10, (b) = 20, (c) = 40, and (d) = 60)

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Fig. 13

Excimer laser cleaning of hydrocarbon based contaminants (peak power 15 MW, number of pulse = 20)

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Fig. 14

Excimer laser cleaning of hydrocarbon and oxide based contaminants

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Fig. 15

Excimer laser cleaned sample (peak power = 40 MW, number of pulse = 80)

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Fig. 16

3D surface topology and depth profile along laser cleaning interface (peak power = 15 MW, number of pulse = 20, contaminant type = grease)

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Fig. 17

Von Mises stress (Pa) distribution on laser cleaned substrate (peak power = 30 MW, contaminant type = yttria particle with grease layer, number of pulse = 40)

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Fig. 18

Effect of laser cleaning on microhardness of the sample surface

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