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Research Papers: Heat Transfer Enhancement

Flow and Heat Transfer of Nanoencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurry Past a Unconfined Square Cylinder

[+] Author and Article Information
Hamid Reza Seyf, Michael R. Wilson, H. B. Ma

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211

Yuwen Zhang


Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211
e-mail: zhangyu@missouri.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received June 7, 2013; final manuscript received October 17, 2013; published online February 26, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Ali Ebadian.

J. Heat Transfer 136(5), 051902 (Feb 26, 2014) (10 pages) Paper No: HT-13-1289; doi: 10.1115/1.4025903 History: Received June 07, 2013; Revised October 17, 2013

Numerical solution is carried out to analyze the effect of nanoencapsulated phase change material (NEPCM) slurry on forced convection heat transfer of steady laminar flow past an isothermal square cylinder. The base fluid is water while the NEPCM particles material is n-octadecane with an average diameter of 100 nm. A parametric study was performed for different volume fraction of nanoparticles ranging from 0% to 30%, two melting temperature ranges, i.e., 10 K and 20 K, and different inlet Reynolds numbers ranging from 15 to 45. The governing equations of flow and energy are solved simultaneously using a finite volume method (FVM) on collocated grid arrangement. It was found that for both NEPCM slurry and pure water, local and average heat transfer coefficients increases with increasing Reynolds number. The results of heat transfer characteristics of slurry flow over the square cylinder showed remarkable enhancement relative to that of the base fluid. The enhancement intensifies for higher particle volume concentrations and higher Reynolds numbers. However, utilizing the slurry can cause higher shear stress on the wall due to higher viscosity of mixture compared to the pure water. The melting temperature range of NEPCM particles has slight effect on heat transfer, although with increasing volume fraction and Reynolds number, lower melting range leads to higher heat transfer coefficient.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of flow around a square cylinder and computational domain

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Fig. 2

Nonuniform computational grid

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Fig. 3

Streamlines and velocity contours of water and slurry at Re = 15

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Fig. 4

Streamlines and velocity contours of water and slurry at Re = 45

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Fig. 5

Temperature contours of water and slurry at Re = 15

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Fig. 6

Temperature contours of water and slurry at Re = 45

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Fig. 7

Local heat transfer coefficients along the edge of square cylinder for Re = 15, 45 and Tmr = 10, 20 for water and the three volumetric concentrations of particles

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Fig. 8

Average heat transfer coefficients for water and NEPCM slurry

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Fig. 9

Average heat transfer coefficients for water and NEPCM slurry

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Fig. 10

Local shear stress for water and NEPCM Slurry at different volume fractions

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Fig. 11

Average shear stress for water and NEPCM slurry for Tmr = 10

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Fig. 12

Average shear stress for water and NEPCM slurry for Tmr = 20

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Fig. 13

Local heat transfer coefficient for different melting ranges with a concentration of 0.1

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Fig. 14

Local heat transfer coefficient for different melting ranges with a concentration of 0.1

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Fig. 15

Average heat transfer coefficient for different melting ranges

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