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Research Papers: Mass Transfer

Mass Transfer in Single Bends Under Annular Two Phase Flow Conditions

[+] Author and Article Information
H. Mazhar, D. Ewing, J. S. Cotton

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
McMaster University,
Hamilton ON, L8S 4L7, Canada

C. Y. Ching

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
McMaster University,
Hamilton ON, L8S 4L7, Canada
e-mail: chingcy@mcmaster.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received May 8, 2013; final manuscript received November 6, 2013; published online January 31, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Oronzio Manca.

J. Heat Transfer 136(4), 043001 (Jan 31, 2014) (8 pages) Paper No: HT-13-1237; doi: 10.1115/1.4026009 History: Received May 08, 2013; Revised November 06, 2013

The distributions of the mass transfer coefficient in horizontal 90 deg bends were measured under a range of two phase annular flow conditions. A dissolving wall technique at a high Schmidt number (Sc = 1280) is used for the measurements. The maximum mass transfer occurred on the centerline of the bend outer wall at an angle of approximately 50 deg from the bend inlet under all tested conditions. The area of maximum mass transfer rate was found to span approximately 30 deg in the circumferential direction. A second region of enhanced mass transfer occurred on the latter part of the bend with a local maximum occurring slightly off the bend centerline in some cases. Changing the air and water superficial velocities (Jv = 22–30 m/s, JL = 0.17–0.41 m/s) showed that the air velocity had a larger effect on the mass transfer rates than the water velocity; however, the effect of the water velocity on the mass transfer was not insignificant.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the test facility showing the main components of the flow loop

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Fig. 2

Schematic of the test section showing the section planes relative to (a) streamwise orientation (b) crosswise orientation

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Fig. 3

Comparison of the (a) mass removal and (b) mass transfer coefficient for different initial water bulk concentrations for Jv = 24.5 and JL = 0.28 m/s

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Fig. 4

Effect of water and air superficial velocity on the Sherwood number distribution for (a) Jv = 30.2 m/s, JL = 0.17, 0.28, and 0.41 m/s and (b) JL = 0.28 m/s, Jv = 22, 24.5, and 29.5 m/s

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Fig. 5

Streamwise Sherwood number profiles along the (a) outer wall and (b) inner wall for JL = 0.28 m/s and different JV

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Fig. 6

Streamwise Sherwood number profiles along the (a) outer wall and (b) inner wall for JV = 29.5 m/s and different JL

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Fig. 7

Azimuthal profiles of the Sherwood number for JL = 0.28 m/s and Jv = 29.5 m/s (), 24.5 m/s (), 22 m/s ()

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Fig. 8

Azimuthal profiles of the Sherwood number for Jv = 29.5 m/s and JL = 0.41 m/s (), 0.28 m/s (), 0.17 m/s ()

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Fig. 9

Effect of air and water superficial velocities on the mass transfer enhancement relative to the upstream straight pipe (Sh/Shpipe) at (a) the first maximum and (b) the secondary maximum. Note: Numbers in bold and italics represent the curent results and those from Ref. [11], respectively.

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