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Research Papers: Electronic Cooling

Electronics Cooling System and Component Design According to the Second Law

[+] Author and Article Information
Ruben Gielen

Applied Mechanics and Energy Conversion,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven,
Celestijnenlaan 300 A bus 2421,
Heverlee B-3001, Belgium
e-mail: ruben.gielen@mech.kuleuven.be

Martine Baelmans

Applied Mechanics and Energy Conversion,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Katholieke Universiteit Leuven,
Celestijnenlaan 300 A bus 2421,
Heverlee B-3001, Belgium
e-mail: martine.baelmans@mech.kuleuven.be

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received January 29, 2013; final manuscript received November 13, 2013; published online February 26, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Ali Khounsary.

J. Heat Transfer 136(5), 051401 (Feb 26, 2014) (11 pages) Paper No: HT-13-1053; doi: 10.1115/1.4026058 History: Received January 29, 2013; Revised November 13, 2013

This work focuses on a comparison of second law based component design on one hand and second law based system design on the other within the context of electronics cooling. Typical electronics cooling components such as a heat sink and a heat exchanger are modeled and designed towards minimum entropy generation on individual level and on system level. A comparison of these levels allows us to qualify and quantify the influences among components induced by a system. Simultaneously, this article endeavors to be an illustrated assessment of the usefulness of efficiency criteria on component level. It turns out that the results of this work reveal a substantial influence of system dependencies on the optimal component design. As such a note of caution is raised about second law based component design which does not take into account the system in which a component has to operate.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

General power plant system

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Fig. 2

Maximum power output according to the first law (I), the second law (II), reality (∗)

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Fig. 3

Schematic representation of a heat sink cooled chip

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Fig. 4

Grassmann diagram for a chip heat sink combination with Ti = T0

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Fig. 5

Comprehensible liquid chip cooling system

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Fig. 6

Louvered fin heat exchanger

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Fig. 7

Control volume of the entire system

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Fig. 8

Grassmann diagram of the optimized system with Ta,ihe = T0

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Fig. 9

Heat sink entropy generation S·gen,hsM (WK−1) as a function of the number of heat sink channels nhs and the inverse water mass flow rate ˙ m·w-1 (–); pressure drop constraint Δpmax (– –); junction temperature constraint Tj,max (); optimal heat sink design (○)

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Fig. 10

Total entropy generation S·gentot (WK−1) as a function of the number of heat sink channels nhs and the inverse water mass flow rate m·w-1(−); pressure drop constraint Δpmax(– –); junction temperature constraint Tj,max (); optimal design design (○)

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Fig. 11

Heat exchanger entropy generation S·gen,he (WK−1) as a function of the number of heat exchanger fins nhe and the inverse air mass flow rate m·a-1(−); fan power constraint PFan,max (– –); water outlet temperature Ta,ihe = 60 °C (); optimal heat exchanger design (○)

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Fig. 12

Total entropy generation S·gentot (WK−1) as a function of the number of heat exchanger fins nhe and the inverse air mass flow rate m·a-1(−); fan power constraint PFan,max(– –); water outlet temperature Ta,ihe = 60 °C ();optimal design (○)

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