0
Discussion

Do We Really Need “Entransy”? A Critical Assessment of a New Quantity in Heat Transfer Analysis

[+] Author and Article Information
H. Herwig

Hamburg University of Technology,
Hamburg, Germany
e-mail: h.herwig@tuhh.de

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received August 8, 2013; final manuscript received November 18, 2013; published online February 18, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Oronzio Manca.

J. Heat Transfer 136(4), 045501 (Feb 18, 2014) (4 pages) Paper No: HT-13-1403; doi: 10.1115/1.4026188 History: Received August 08, 2013; Revised November 18, 2013

Recently, a group of scientists introduced a new quantity for the analysis of heat transfer problems. They called it entransy since according to their understanding it is both, an indication of the nature of energy as well as that of the heat transfer ability. This concept is critically assessed on the background of two questions: Is entransy as an extension of the well established theory of heat transfer consistent with this classical approach? And: Is there a real need for the extension of the classical theory by introducing entransy as a quantity that was missing in the past?

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2014 by ASME
Topics: Heat transfer , Heat
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Forms of energy (state variables) and energy transport (process variables) with respect to a thermodynamic system, here: closed system, i.e., no transport eδm

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Entropy change δQs and entropy generation δirrs due to an energy transfer in form of heat out of (a) and into (b) a thermodynamic system

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In