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Research Papers: Heat Transfer in Manufacturing

Experimental Investigation of Effect of Different Types of Surfactants and Jet Height on Cooling of a Hot Steel Plate

[+] Author and Article Information
Satya V. Ravikumar, Jay M. Jha, Soumya S. Mohapatra

Department of Chemical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Kharagpur 721302, India

Surjya K. Pal

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Kharagpur 721302, India

Sudipto Chakraborty

Department of Chemical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology,
Kharagpur 721302, India
e-mail: sc@che.iitkgp.ernet.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received October 18, 2012; final manuscript received March 7, 2014; published online April 10, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Wei Tong.

J. Heat Transfer 136(7), 072102 (Apr 10, 2014) (10 pages) Paper No: HT-12-1579; doi: 10.1115/1.4027182 History: Received October 18, 2012; Revised March 07, 2014

Heat transfer studies of a hot AISI 304 stainless steel plate by water jet impingement with different concentrations of three different types of surfactants have been investigated. The study involves a square plate of 100 mm × 100 mm surface area and 6 mm thickness with three subsurface thermocouples positioned at various locations inside the plate. The influence of jet height has been studied by varying the distance between the nozzle and plate from 200 mm to 600 mm. The results show that the heat transfer rate is found to increase with the jet height up to 400 mm and thereafter decreases due to capillary instability of liquid jet. Based on the maximum surface heat flux obtained for a particular nozzle height of 400 mm and an initial surface temperature of 900 °C, further experiments have been carried out with different types of surfactants. The types of surfactants used in the experimental study are anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS), cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) and nonionic surfactant (Polyoxyethylene 20 sorbitan monolaurate, Tween 20). During cooling, the transient temperature data measured by thermocouples have been analyzed by inverse heat conduction procedure to calculate surface heat flux and surface temperatures. The increase in surface heat flux has been observed with increasing concentration of surfactants and it has been found to be limited to a particular concentration of surfactant after which further increase in concentration leads to decrease in heat flux. Use of surfactant added water minimizes the surface tension and promotes better spreadability of coolant on the test specimen by reducing the solid–liquid contact angle. The maximum heat transfer rate has been found by using nonionic surfactant additive which can primarily be attributed to its lesser foam formability nature.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic drawing of experimental setup

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Fig. 2

(a) Schematic diagram of test surface showing thermocouple location and (b) schematic diagram of ceramic brick used to hold the test sample

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Fig. 3

2D planar computational domain for the inverse heat conduction analysis

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Fig. 4

Example of measured cooling curve at different locations of the test plate

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Fig. 5

Calculated surface temperature profile at different locations of the test plate

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Fig. 6

Variation of surface heat flux with time during jet impingement cooling

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Fig. 7

Boiling curves as a function of surface temperature at all three zones of the test plate

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Fig. 8

Effect of jet height on heat flux curve at stagnant zone during water jet cooling

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Fig. 9

Effect of jet height on heat flux curve at stagnant zone during water jet with surfactant (SDS) cooling

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Fig. 10

Calculated surface heat flux at stagnant zone as a function of cooling time for water jet with different concentrations of SDS

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Fig. 11

Calculated surface heat flux at stagnant zone as a function of cooling time for water jet with different concentrations of CTAB

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Fig. 12

Calculated surface heat flux at stagnant zone as a function of cooling time for water jet with different concentrations of Tween 20

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Fig. 13

Variation of average surface heat flux and surface cooling rate with the concentration of SDS

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Fig. 14

Variation of average surface heat flux and surface cooling rate with the concentration of CTAB

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Fig. 15

Variation of average surface heat flux and surface cooling rate with the concentration of Tween 20

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