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Research Papers: Experimental Techniques

Pulsed Thermal Imaging Measurement of Thermal Properties for Thermal Barrier Coatings Based on a Multilayer Heat Transfer Model

[+] Author and Article Information
J. G. Sun

Nuclear Engineering Division,
Argonne National Laboratory,
Argonne, IL 60439
e-mail: sun@anl.gov

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received April 4, 2013; final manuscript received March 12, 2014; published online May 21, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Wilson K. S. Chiu.

J. Heat Transfer 136(8), 081601 (May 21, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: HT-13-1187; doi: 10.1115/1.4027551 History: Received April 04, 2013; Revised March 12, 2014

Thermal properties of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are important parameters for the safe and efficient operation of advanced turbine engines. This paper presents a new method, the pulsed thermal imaging–multilayer analysis (PTI–MLA) method, which can measure the coating thermal conductivity and heat capacity distributions over an entire engine component surface. This method utilizes a multilayer heat transfer model to analyze the surface temperature response acquired from a one-sided pulsed thermal imaging experiment. It was identified that several experimental system parameters and TBC material parameters may affect the coating surface temperature response. All of these parameters were evaluated and incorporated as necessary into the formulations. The PTI–MLA method was demonstrated by analyzing three TBC samples, and the experimental results were compared with those obtained from other methods.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of one-sided pulsed thermal imaging experimental system

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Fig. 4

Sensitivity variables d ln g1/d ln e12 and d ln f1/d ln e12 as function of e12

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Fig. 3

Coating peak slope value f1 and the peak location parameter g1 as function of e12

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Fig. 2

Logarithmic surface temperature lnT and slope d ln T/d ln t as function of time t for a typical semi-infinite TBC material system

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Fig. 5

Logarithmic surface temperature slope d ln T/d ln t as function of time t for the same TBC material system used in Fig. 2 plots but with finite substrate thicknesses L2

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Fig. 6

Logarithmic surface temperature slope d ln T/d ln t as function of time t for a semi-infinite material measured with and without flash duration

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Fig. 7

Measured average surface (a) temperature and (b) temperature–slope data for three TBC samples listed in Table 1

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Fig. 8

Predicted (a) thermal conductivity and (b) heat capacity images of three TBC samples

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Fig. 9

Comparison of measured and predicted surface (a) temperature and (b) temperature–slope data for a typical pixel in each of three TBC samples

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