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Research Papers: Mass Transfer

Entropy Generation Analysis of a Chemical Absorption Process Where Carbon Dioxide is Absorbed by Falling Monoethanolamine Solution Film

[+] Author and Article Information
Imen Chermiti

Chemical and Process Engineering Department,
Applied Thermodynamics Unit,
Engineers National School of Gabès,
Gabès University,
Omar Ibn El Khattab Street,
Gabès 6029, Tunisia
e-mail: chermitii@yahoo.fr

Nejib Hidouri, Ammar Ben Brahim

Chemical and Process Engineering Department,
Applied Thermodynamics Unit,
Engineers National School of Gabès,
Gabès University,
Omar Ibn El Khattab Street,
Gabès 6029, Tunisia

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received December 20, 2013; final manuscript received June 30, 2014; published online October 21, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Andrey Kuznetsov.

J. Heat Transfer 136(12), 123001 (Oct 21, 2014) (10 pages) Paper No: HT-13-1658; doi: 10.1115/1.4028114 History: Received December 20, 2013; Revised June 30, 2014

The present paper reports a study about entropy generation analysis for the case of chemical absorption of a gas into laminar falling liquid film. The CO2 absorption into monoethanolamine (MEA) aqueous solutions has been considered. Temperature and concentration expressions are determined by using Laplace transform and used for the entropy generation calculation. The effects of irreversibilities due to heat transfer, mass transfer, viscous effects, coupling effects between heat and mass transfer, and chemical reaction on the total entropy generation of the considered system are derived. The obtained results show that entropy generation is mainly due to chemical reaction irreversibility at the gas–liquid interface. Between this interface and the reaction film thickness (where the reaction take place), entropy generation is due to both chemical reaction and mass transfer irreversibilities. More details concerning the contribution of each kind of irreversibility to entropy generation through the falling film are graphically presented and discussed.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) Absorber: a falling liquid film in contact with the gas phase and (b) typical profiles of velocity, temperature, and concentration through the falling film

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

(a) Falling film velocity vL versus x and (b) viscous irreversibility Sg,v versus x: (- - - -) MEA (5%), ReL = 17; (——) MEA (10%), ReL = 12, 25; (---●---) MEA (25%), ReL = 4

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

(a) Falling film temperature TL versus x and (b) thermal entropy generation Sg,th versus x: (- - - -) MEA (5%), ReL = 17; (——) MEA (10%), ReL = 12, 25; (---●---) MEA (25%), ReL = 4

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

(a) Gas concentration, CAL, versus x and (b) entropy generation due to mass transfer, Sg,m, versus x: (- - - -) MEA (5%), ReL = 17; (——) MEA (10%), ReL = 12, 25; (---●---) MEA (25%), ReL = 4

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Entropy generation due to chemical reaction Sg,mr versus x: (- - - -) MEA (5%), ReL = 17; (——) MEA (10%), ReL = 12, 25; (---●---) MEA (25%), ReL = 4

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Entropy generation due to the coupling effects between heat and mass transfer, Sg,mth, versus x: (- - - -) MEA (5%), ReL = 17; (——) MEA (10%), ReL = 12, 25; (---●---) MEA (25%), ReL = 4

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Total entropy generation Sgen versus x: (- - - -) MEA (5%), ReL = 17; (——) MEA (10%), ReL = 12, 25; (---●---) MEA (25%), ReL = 4

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