0
Research Papers: Forced Convection

Numerical Study of Turbulent Flow and Convective Heat Transfer Characteristics in Helical Rectangular Ducts

[+] Author and Article Information
Yunfei Xing

State Key Laboratory
of High Temperature Gas Dynamics,
Institute of Mechanics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: xingyunfei@imech.ac.cn

Fengquan Zhong

State Key Laboratory
of High Temperature Gas Dynamics,
Institute of Mechanics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: fzhong@imech.ac.cn

Xinyu Zhang

State Key Laboratory
of High Temperature Gas Dynamics,
Institute of Mechanics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: changxy@imech.ac.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received January 23, 2014; final manuscript received September 11, 2014; published online September 30, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Ali Khounsary.

J. Heat Transfer 136(12), 121701 (Sep 30, 2014) (6 pages) Paper No: HT-14-1036; doi: 10.1115/1.4028583 History: Received January 23, 2014; Revised September 11, 2014

Three-dimensional turbulent forced convective heat transfer and its flow characteristics in helical rectangular ducts are simulated using SST k–ω turbulence model. The velocity field and temperature field at different axial locations along the axial direction are analyzed for different inlet Reynolds numbers, different curvatures, and torsions. The causes of heat transfer differences between the inner and outer wall of the helical rectangular ducts are discussed as well as the differences between helical and straight duct. A secondary flow is generated due to the centrifugal effect between the inner and outer walls. For the present study, the flow and thermal field become periodic after the first turn. It is found that Reynolds number can enhance the overall heat transfer. Instead, torsion and curvature change the overall heat transfer slightly. But the aspect ratio of the rectangular cross section can significantly affect heat transfer coefficient.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2014 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Aly, W. I., Inaba, H., Haruki, N., and Horibe, A., 2006, “Drag, and Heat Transfer Reduction Phenomena of Drag-Reducing Surfactant Solutions in Straight and Helical Pipes,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 128(8), pp. 800–810. [CrossRef]
Kao, H. C., 1987, “Torsion Effect on Fully Developed Flow in a Helical Pipe,” J. Fluid Mech., 184, pp. 335–356. [CrossRef]
Xin, R. C., and Ebadian, M. A., 1997, “The Effects of Prandtl Numbers on Local and Average Convective Heat Transfer Characteristics in Helical Pipes,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 119(3), pp. 467–473. [CrossRef]
Ali, M. E., 2004, “Free Convection Heat Transfer From the Outer Surface of Vertically Oriented Helical Coils in Glycerol–Water Solution,” Heat Mass Transfer, 40(8), pp. 615–620. [CrossRef]
Wu, S. Y., Chen, S. J., Li, Y. R., and Li, L. J., 2009, “Numerical Investigation of Turbulent Flow, Heat Transfer and Entropy Generation in a Helical Coiled Tube With Larger Curvature Ratio,” Heat Mass Transfer, 45(5), pp. 569–578. [CrossRef]
Pizza, I. D., and Ciofalo, M., 2010, “Numerical Prediction of Turbulent Flow and Heat Transfer in Helical Coiled Pipes,” Intern. J. Therm. Sci., 49(1), pp. 653–663. [CrossRef]
Moawed, M., 2011, “Experimental Study of Forced Convection From Helical Coiled Tubes With Different Parameters,” Energy Convers. Manage., 52(2), pp. 1150–1156. [CrossRef]
Kaew-On, J., Nakkaew, S., and Wongwises, S., 2013, “Single-Phase Heat Transfer in the Straight and Helical Coiled Tubes,” ASME Paper No. ICNMM2013-73109. [CrossRef]
Mandal, M. M., and Nigam, K. D. P., 2009, “Experimental Study on Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer of Turbulent Flow in Tube in Tube Helical Heat Exchanger,” Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 48(20), pp. 9318–9324. [CrossRef]
Mandal, M. M., Kumar, V., and Nigam, K. D. P., 2010, “Augmentation of Heat Transfer Performance in Coiled Flow Inverter vis-à-vis Conventional Heat Exchanger,” Chem. Eng. Sci., 65(2), pp. 999–1007. [CrossRef]
Woike, M. R., and Willis, B. P., 2000, “Integrated Systems Testing for the Hypersonic Tunnel Facility,” AIAA Paper No. 2000-2446. [CrossRef]
Traci, R. M., Farr, J. L., and Laganelli, T., 2002, “A Thermal Management Systems Model for the NASA GTX RBCC Concept,” NASA, Technical Report No. NASA/CR-2002-211587.
Naraghi, M. H., Pizzarelli, M., and Champagnon, R., 2011, “Heat Transfer Correlations for Transitional Coolant Flow From Curved to Straight Cooling Channel Sections,” AIAA Paper No. 2011-5843. [CrossRef]
Thangam, S., and Hur, N., 1990, “Laminar Secondary Flows in Curved Rectangular Ducts,” J. Fluid Mech., 217(1), pp. 421–440. [CrossRef]
Bolinder, C. J., and Sunden, B., 1995, “Flow Visualization and LDV Measurements of Laminar Flow in a Helical Square Duct With Finite Pitch,” Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci., 11(4), pp. 348–363. [CrossRef]
Bolinder, C. J., 1996, “First and Higher-Order Effects of Curvature and Torsion on the Flow in a Helical Rectangular Duct,” J. Fluid Mech., 314, pp. 113–138. [CrossRef]
Zabielski, L., and Mestel, A. J., 1998, “Steady Flow a Helically Symmetric Pipe,” J. Fluid Mech., 370, pp. 297–320. [CrossRef]
Zabielski, L., and Mestel, A., 2005, “Kinematic Dynamo Action in a Helical Pipe,” J. Fluid Mech., 535, pp. 347–367. [CrossRef]
Sakalis, V. D., Hatzikonstantinou, P. M., and Papadopoulos, P. K., 2005, “Numerical Procedure for the Laminar Developed Flow in a Helical Square Duct,” ASME J. Fluids Eng., 127(1), pp. 136–148. [CrossRef]
Egner, M. W., and Burmeister, L. C., 2005, “Heat Transfer for Laminar Flow in Spiral Ducts of Rectangular Cross Section,” ASME J. Heat Transfer, 127(3), pp. 352–356. [CrossRef]
Kurnia, J. C., Sasmito, A. P., and Mujumdar, A. S., 2011, “Evaluation of the Heat Transfer Performance of Helical Coils of Non-Circular Tubes,” J. Zhejiang Univ. Sci. A, 12(1), pp. 63–70. [CrossRef]
Mori, Y., Uchida, Y., and Ukon, T., 1971, “Forced Convective Heat Transfer in a Curved Channel With a Square Cross Section,” Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 14(3), pp. 1787–1805. [CrossRef]
Srinivasan, P. S., Nandapurkar, S., and Holland, F. A., 1970, “Friction Factor for Coils,” Trans. Inst. Chem. Eng., 48(6), pp. 156–161.

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of a helical rectangular duct

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Development of velocity field in varied cross sections along the axial direction (δ=0.192, λ=0.11, and Re = 55,000)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Distribution of streamlines at varied cross sections (δ=0.192, λ=0.11, and Re = 55,000)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Development of temperature field along the axial direction (δ=0.192, λ=0.11, and Re = 55,000)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Development of turbulence intensities distribution along the axial direction (δ=0.192, λ=0.11, and Re = 55,000)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Distribution of averaged heat transfer coefficients on the inner and outer walls (δ=0.192, λ=0.11, and Re = 55000)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Development of Nusselt numbers on the inner walls (δ=0.192 and λ=0.11)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Distribution of one-turn averaged heat transfer coefficients on the inner and outer walls of helical duct with two pitches (δ=0.192 and Re = 55,000)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Distribution of one-turn averaged heat transfer coefficients on the inner and outer walls of helical duct with two curvatures (λ = 0.11 and Re = 55,000)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

The cross section of ducts (unit: mm)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Comparison of averaged heat transfer coefficients on the inner and outer walls for different duct configurations (Re = 55,000)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

The heat transfer coefficient distribution on the inner wall (Re = 55,000)

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In