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Research Papers: Evaporation, Boiling, and Condensation

Heat Flux Controlled Pool Boiling of Zirconia–Water and Silver–Water Nanofluids on a Flat Plate: A Coupled Map Lattice Simulation

[+] Author and Article Information
Sayan Sadhu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur,
Kanpur, UP 208016, India

P. S. Ghoshdastidar

Mem. ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur,
Kanpur, UP 208016, India
e-mail: psg@iitk.ac.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received November 14, 2013; final manuscript received October 22, 2014; published online November 25, 2014. Assoc. Editor: W. Q. Tao.

J. Heat Transfer 137(2), 021503 (Feb 01, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: HT-13-1581; doi: 10.1115/1.4028974 History: Received November 14, 2013; Revised October 22, 2014; Online November 25, 2014

In the present work, the characteristic atmospheric saturated heat flux controlled pool boiling curves for zirconia–water and silver–water nanofluids have been reproduced by the coupled map lattice (CML) method using a two-dimensional (2D) boiling field model. The heater is a long horizontal flat plate of thickness 0.44 mm. The pool height is 0.7 mm. The stirring action of the bubbles is modeled by increasing the fluid thermal diffusivity by an enhancement factor. The thermal conduction in the plate is also incorporated into the model. The basic advantage of CML is that individual bubbles are not tracked, and yet the effects of bubbles are reflected qualitatively in the final solution. In the simulation of atmospheric saturated pool boiling of water minimum cavity diameter taken is 0.8 μm based on which a random distribution of cavity sizes has been specified. In the boiling of ZrO2–water nanofluid there is a deposition of nanoparticles in the cavities on the heated surface resulting in reduction of surface roughness. This feature is taken care of by proportionate decrease in minimum cavity diameter. The CML model predicts decrease in heat transfer coefficient and increase in critical heat flux (CHF) with increase in zirconia nanoparticle concentration. In the case of Ag–water nanofluid no such deposition of nanoparticles has been reported; rather surface oxidation occurs which increases the surface roughness. This is simulated by proportionately increasing the minimum cavity diameter with weight fractions of nanoparticles. The present CML model predicts increase in the heat transfer coefficient and decrease in CHF with increase in silver nanoparticle concentration. Thus, the CML results for the boiling of the aforesaid two nanofluids match qualitatively with the published experimental works.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Computational domain and sublattices

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Fig. 2

Nucleation superheat distribution for pool boiling of water at p = 1 bar

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Fig. 3

Flowchart of the solution algorithm for pool boiling of water

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Fig. 4

Flowchart of the solution algorithm for pool boiling of water-based nanofluids

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Fig. 5

Comparison of CML-produced pool boiling curves for water and ZrO2–water nanofluids with the experimental results of Chopkar et al. [7]

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Fig. 6

Comparison of CML-produced pool boiling curves for water and Ag–water nanofluids with the experimental results of Kathiravan et al. [11]

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Fig. 7

Comparison of CML-produced percent enhancement of heat transfer coefficient versus heat flux for Ag–water nanofluids with the experimental results of Kathiravan et al. [11]

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