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Research Papers: Forced Convection

Temperature and Entropy Generation Analyses Between and Inside Rotating Cylinders Using Copper–Water Nanofluid

[+] Author and Article Information
Mohsen Torabi

Department of Mechanical
and Biomedical Engineering,
City University of Hong Kong,
83 Tat Chee Avenue,
Kowloon, Hong Kong
e-mail: Torabi_mech@yahoo.com; mohsen.torabi@my.cityu.edu.hk

Kaili Zhang

Department of Mechanical
and Biomedical Engineering,
City University of Hong Kong,
83 Tat Chee Avenue,
Kowloon, Hong Kong

Shohel Mahmud

School of Engineering,
University of Guelph,
Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received August 8, 2014; final manuscript received December 30, 2014; published online February 3, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Robert D. Tzou.

J. Heat Transfer 137(5), 051701 (May 01, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: HT-14-1519; doi: 10.1115/1.4029596 History: Received August 08, 2014; Revised December 30, 2014; Online February 03, 2015

Entropy generation is squarely linked with irreversibility, and consequently with exergy destruction within a thermal system. This study concerns with the temperature distribution, and local and volumetric averaged entropy generation rates within a cylindrical system with two solid co-rotating inner and outer parts and the middle nanofluid flow part. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivities for solid materials are included within the modeling. To obtain the temperature formula within all three sections, a combined analytical–numerical solution technique is applied. An exact analytical solution is also obtained, when constant thermal conductivities for solid materials are assumed. The resultant data from the analytical–numerical solution technique is verified against the investigated exact solution. Thereafter, the velocity and temperature fields from the combined analytical–numerical solution technique are incorporated into the entropy generation formulations to obtain the local and volumetric averaged entropy generation rates. Using abovementioned procedure, the effects of thermophysical parameters such as nanoparticles volume concentration, Brinkman number, thermal conductivity parameter ratios, outer temperature boundary condition, internal heat generation rates and velocity ratios on the temperature field, and entropy generation rates are investigated.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Configuration of hollow cylinder (not to scale)

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Fig. 2

Comparison of solution in Sec. 4 (solid line) and solution in Sec. 5 (circle symbol) for (a) temperature distribution and (b) local entropy generation rate in all three sections of the system

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Fig. 3

Effect of different values of solid volume fraction on (a) temperature distribution and (b) local entropy generation rate in all three sections of the system

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Fig. 4

Effect of different values of Brinkman number on (a) temperature distribution and (b) local entropy generation rate in all three sections of the system

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Fig. 5

Effect of different values of dimensionless internal heat generation in both solid parts on (a) temperature distribution and (b) local entropy generation rate in all three sections of the system

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Fig. 6

Effects of thermal conductivity ratios on (a) temperature distribution and (b) local entropy generation rate in all three sections of the system

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Fig. 7

Dimensionless volumetric averaged entropy generation rate versus internal heat generation in solid parts with different values of solid volume fraction and dimensionless outer surface temperature

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Fig. 8

Effects of Brinkman number and dimensionless slope of the thermal conductivity-temperature curve on dimensionless volumetric averaged entropy generation rate, using different values of (a) R2 and (b) R3

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Fig. 9

Dimensionless volumetric averaged entropy generation rate versus Brinkman number with different values of solid volume fraction and thermal conductivity ratios

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