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Research Papers

Evolution in the Design of V-Shaped Highly Conductive Pathways Embedded in a Heat-Generating Piece

[+] Author and Article Information
M. R. Hajmohammadi

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Amirkabir University of Technology,
Tehran 15875-4413, Iran
e-mail: mh.hajmohammadi@yahoo.com

G. Lorenzini

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale,
Università degli Studi di Parma,
Parco Area delle Scienze 181/A,
Parma 43124, Italy
e-mail: giulio.lorenzini@unipr.it

O. Joneydi Shariatzadeh

Department of Energy Technology,
Lappeenranta University of Technology,
P.O. Box 20, 53851,
Lappeenranta 53851, Finland
e-mail: omid.joneydi@gmail.com

C. Biserni

Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale,
Università degli Studi di Bologna,
Viale Risorgimento 2,
Bologna 40136, Italy

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received December 9, 2013; final manuscript received February 21, 2014; published online March 17, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Gongnan Xie.

J. Heat Transfer 137(6), 061001 (Jun 01, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: HT-13-1632; doi: 10.1115/1.4029847 History: Received December 09, 2013; Revised February 21, 2014; Online March 17, 2015

This paper presents the evolution of architecture of high conductivity pathways embedded into a heat generating body on the basis of Constructal theory. The main objective is to introduce new geometries for the highly conductive pathways, precisely configurations shaped as V. Four types of V-shaped inserts, evolving from “V1” to “V4,” have been comparatively considered. Geometric optimization of design is conducted to minimize the peak temperature of the heat generating piece. Many ideas emerged from this work: first of all, the numerical results demonstrated that the V-shaped pathways remarkably surpass the performance of some basic configurations already mentioned in literature, i.e., “I and X-shaped” pathways. Furthermore, the evolution of configurations from V1 to V4 resulted in a gradual reduction of the hot spot temperature, according to the principle of “optimal distribution of imperfections” that characterizes the constructal law.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Geometry and coordinate system definition of high conductivity pathways (inserts) intruding a square heat generating piece

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Fig. 10

Comparison of V4 with other configurations

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Fig. 11

Minimum volume fraction required for maintaining the peak temperature of the heat generating body under an allowable level, T˜max

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Fig. 12

Optimal configurations of V-shaped inserts

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Fig. 9

Comparison of V3 with other configurations

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Fig. 8

Influence of ωa on the peak temperature of a heat generating body intruded by a V-shaped insert of V3 type

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Fig. 7

Comparison of V2 with other configurations

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Fig. 6

Influence of ωm on the peak temperature of a heat generating body intruded by a V-shaped insert of V2 type

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Fig. 5

Last level of optimization: optimized parameters related to a V-shaped insert of V1 type and the corresponding minimum peak temperatures in comparison with minimum peak temperatures mentioned in literature for other configurations

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Fig. 4

Influence of Di/Hi on the peak temperatures for a V1 type

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Fig. 3

Effects of α on the peak temperatures for a V1 type of several λ

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Fig. 2

Effects of α on the peak (maximum) temperature of a square piece intruded by a V-shaped insert of V1 type for several ω

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