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Research Papers: Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer

Hotspot Size-Dependent Thermal Boundary Conductance in Nondiffusive Heat Conduction

[+] Author and Article Information
Yanbao Ma

School of Engineering,
University of California at Merced,
Merced, CA 95343
e-mail: yma5@ucmerced.edu

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received August 5, 2014; final manuscript received March 18, 2015; published online April 16, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Robert D. Tzou.

J. Heat Transfer 137(8), 082401 (Aug 01, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: HT-14-1517; doi: 10.1115/1.4030170 History: Received August 05, 2014; Revised March 18, 2015; Online April 16, 2015

Thermal transport across interfaces can play a critical role in nanosystems for thermal management and thermal energy conversion. Here, we show the dependence of the thermal boundary conductance (G) of the interface between a 70-nm Al transducer and a Si substrate on the size of a laser pump diameter (D) in the time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) experiments at room temperature. For D ≥ 30 μm, G approaches to a constant where diffusion dominates the heat transfer processes. When D decreases from 30 μm to 3.65 μm, G decreases from 240 to 170 MW/m2K due to the increasing nonlocal effects from nondiffusive heat transport. This finding is vital to our understanding of the thermal boundary conductance: it depends not only on inherent interfacial conditions but also on external heating conditions, which makes the accurate measurements and theoretical predictions of thermal transport across interfaces in micro/nanosystems more challenging.

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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Comparison of data fitting results of the TPHC model with TDTR data [26]. (a) Amplitude versus time delay and (b) phase angle versus time delay. Pump laser 1/e2 diameter D = 3.65 μm and modulation frequency f = 2.01 MHz.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Comparison of data fitting results of the TPHC model and Fourier's law in the TDTR data analyses. A-fitting stands for amplitude fitting, and P-fitting means phase angle fitting. (a) and (b) Amplitude and phase angle versus time delay for pump laser diameter D = 3.65 μm and modulation frequency f = 2.01 MHz. (c) and (d) Amplitude and phase angle versus time delay for pump laser diameter D = 5.44 μm and modulation frequency f = 2.01 MHz.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Comparison of data fitting results of the TPHC model and Fourier's law in the TDTR data analyses. A-fitting stands for amplitude fitting, and P-fitting means phase angle fitting. (a) and (b) Amplitude and phase angle versus time delay for pump laser diameter D = 8.9 μm and modulation frequency f = 4.77 MHz. (c) and (d) Amplitude and phase angle versus time delay for pump laser diameter D = 60 μm and modulation frequency f = 6.85 MHz.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Thermal boundary conductance G versus the pump laser 1/e2 diameter D

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