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Research Papers

Thermal Electrical Property Effects of Bone Structure on the Magnetic-Nanoparticle Enhanced Hyperthermia Targeting Tumor Underneath the Ribs

[+] Author and Article Information
Chao Jin

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
School of Medicine,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China

Zhi-Zhu He

Beijing Key Laboratory of Cryo-Biomedical
Engineering and Key Laboratory of Cryogenics,
Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China

Jing Liu

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
School of Medicine,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China
Beijing Key Laboratory of Cryo-Biomedical
Engineering and Key Laboratory of Cryogenics,
Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received February 5, 2014; final manuscript received August 21, 2014; published online May 14, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Yogesh Jaluria.

J. Heat Transfer 137(9), 091005 (Sep 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: HT-14-1063; doi: 10.1115/1.4030213 History: Received February 05, 2014; Revised August 21, 2014; Online May 14, 2015

Bone has very different thermal and electrical properties with the surrounding tissues. Misjustification of the heating dosage during an electromagnetic (EM) hyperthermia may lead to the failure of the treatment. Here aiming to disclose such clinically important issue, the present study presented a theoretical evaluation on the heating effects of magnetic-nanoparticles (MNPs) enhanced hyperthermia on the liver tumor underneath the ribs with bone features particularly addressed. The results revealed the following factors: (1) The existence of bone structure, i.e., ribs has an inevitable effect on the distribution of EM field; specifically, due to its lower dielectric property, the bone structure served as a barrier to attenuate the transport of EM energy and conversion of heat into the tissues, especially the tumor in the deep body. (2) Applying higher dosage or larger size MNPs would significantly enhance the temperature elevation at the target tumor tissues and thereby guarantee the performance of the hyperthermia. (3) Further parametric studies indicated that a higher frequency EM field would result in a worse heating effect; while stronger EM field will evidently enhance the heating effects of the hyperthermia process. This study promoted the better understanding of the EM heating on the bone structured tissues, and the findings are expected to provide valuable reference for planning an accurate surgery in future clinical liver tumor EM ablation.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic illustration of human liver anatomy and EM induced hyperthermia configuration. (a) The human anatomy of liver underneath the ribs and (b) the computational domain for simulating the MNP enhanced hyperthermia.

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Fig. 2

Comparison between the steady-state electrical field distribution without (a), (c) and with bone structure (b), (d) at section x = 0.04 m (U = 10 V and f = 1.0 MHz)

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Fig. 3

The EM hyperthermia-induced thermal effects within the tissue. (a) and (c), respectively, denote the steady-state heat source and temperature response at section x = 0.04 m without bone structure; and (b) and (d) are the corresponding computed results with bone structure (U = 10 V, f = 1.0 MHz, n = 1 × 1021m−3, r = 10 nm, and χ" = 18).

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Fig. 4

The EM hyperthermia-induced thermal effects within the tissue. (a) and (c), respectively, denote the steady-state heat source and temperature response at section x = 0.04 m with the tumor located at (x = 4 cm, y = 7 cm, and z = 5 cm); and (b) and (d) are the corresponding computed results with the tumor located at (x = 4 cm, y = 4 cm, and z = 4 cm) (U = 10 V, f = 1.0 MHz, n = 1 × 1021m−3, r = 10 nm, and χ" = 18).

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Fig. 5

The EM hyperthermia-induced temperature profiles at the section x = 0.04 m with: (a) U = 10 V, (b) U = 15 V, and (c) U = 20 V (f = 1.0 MHz, n = 1 × 1021m−3, r = 10 nm, and χ" = 18)

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Fig. 6

The EM hyperthermia-induced temperature profiles at the section x = 0.04 m with: (a) f = 0.5 MHz, (b) f = 1.0 MHz, and (c) f = 5.0 MHz (U = 10 V, n = 1 × 1021m−3, r = 10 nm, and χ" = 18)

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Fig. 7

The EM hyperthermia-induced temperature profiles at the section x = 0.04 m with: (a) r = 5 nm, (b) r = 10 nm, and (c) r = 15 nm (U = 10 V, f = 1.0 MHz, n = 1 × 1021m−3, and χ" = 18)

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Fig. 8

The EM hyperthermia-induced temperature profiles at the section x = 0.04 m with: (a) n = 1 × 1021m−3, (b) n = 2 × 1021m−3, and (c) n = 3 × 1021m−3 (U = 10 V, f = 1.0 MHz, r = 10 nm, and χ" = 18)

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