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Research Papers

Stability and Thermophysical Properties of Binary Propanol–Water Mixtures-Based Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Suspensions

[+] Author and Article Information
Liang Wang

Institute of Engineering Thermophysics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: wangliang@iet.cn

Jian Zhang

Institute of Engineering Thermophysics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: zhangjian@iet.cn

Li Liu

Institute of Engineering Thermophysics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: liuliairspring@163.com

Yifei Wang

Institute of Engineering Thermophysics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: wangyifei@iet.cn

Lei Chai

Institute of Engineering Thermophysics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: chailei@iet.cn

Zheng Yang

Institute of Engineering Thermophysics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: yangzheng@iet.cn

Haisheng Chen

Institute of Engineering Thermophysics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: chen_hs@iet.cn

Chunqing Tan

Institute of Engineering Thermophysics,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Beijing 100190, China
e-mail: tan@iet.cn

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received April 30, 2014; final manuscript received August 24, 2014; published online May 14, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Yogesh Jaluria.

J. Heat Transfer 137(9), 091019 (Sep 01, 2015) (5 pages) Paper No: HT-14-1271; doi: 10.1115/1.4030235 History: Received April 30, 2014; Revised August 24, 2014; Online May 14, 2015

In order to obtain stable latent functionally thermal fluids for heat transfer and heat storage, microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) suspensions with binary propanol–water mixtures of different proportions as base fluid were formulated. The stability study finds the binary propanol–water mixtures, after having stood for 48 hr, with a density of 941 kg/m3 exhibit the best stability. The morphology and thermophysical properties of the 10–40 wt.% MPCM suspensions, such as diameter distribution, latent heat and heat capacity, rheology and viscosity, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion coefficients, were studied experimentally. The influence of MPCM concentration and temperature on the thermophysical properties was analyzed as well.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Appearance of MPCM suspensions with different base fluids after standing 48 hr

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Fig. 2

SEM photo of MPCM particles

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Fig. 3

Diameter distribution of MPCM particle

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Fig. 4

DSC curve of MPCM during phase change

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Fig. 5

DSC curve of 10∼40 wt.% MPCM suspensions

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Fig. 6

Shear stress versus shear rate of 40 wt.% MPCM suspensions

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Fig. 7

Viscosity versus temperature of 10–40 wt.% MPCM suspensions

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Fig. 8

Relative viscosity versus volume fraction of suspensions

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Fig. 9

Thermal conductivity versus volume fraction of suspensions

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Fig. 10

Thermal conductivity versus temperature of the 40 wt.% MPCM suspension

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Fig. 11

Thermal expansion coefficient versus temperature

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