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Research Papers: Experimental Techniques

A Novel Application of the Thermal Probe: Nonlinear and Phase Change Problems

[+] Author and Article Information
M. H. Adjali

School of Engineering and Materials Science,
Queen Mary University,
Mile End Road,
London E1 4NS, UK
e-mail: H.adjali@qmul.ac.uk

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received March 10, 2014; final manuscript received April 23, 2015; published online June 2, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Ali Khounsary.

J. Heat Transfer 137(10), 101601 (Oct 01, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: HT-14-1118; doi: 10.1115/1.4030495 History: Received March 10, 2014; Revised April 23, 2015; Online June 02, 2015

This paper reports on a new application of the thermal probe in nonlinear systems. Whereas the thermal probe has been originally developed to determine the thermal conductivity in linear cases (where the thermophysical properties are considered independent of the temperature), the method used here exploits a direct nonlinear numerical model associated with a parameter estimation technique to determine temperature dependent thermal conductivities. It has been applied to a water-agar gel during phase change and the thermal conductivities within the corresponding temperature interval could be determined.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 7

Variation of enthalpy with temperature for 4% water-agar gel

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Fig. 6

Subdivision of the system (not to scale)

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Fig. 5

Details of the measurement cell and thermal probe

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Fig. 4

Experimental setup

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Fig. 3

Experimental temperature rise in the probe: nonlinear case

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Fig. 2

Experimental temperature rise in the probe: linear case

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Fig. 1

Variation of the specific heat with temperature for 4% water-agar gel

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Fig. 10

Measured temperature rise in the probe, heating power 40 W/m

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Fig. 8

Measured temperature rise in the probe, heating power 10 W/m

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Fig. 9

Individually determined water-agar gel thermal conductivity

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Fig. 11

Simultaneously determined water-agar gel thermal conductivity

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Fig. 12

Reduced sensitivity coefficients variation, heating power 10 W/m

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Fig. 13

Reduced sensitivity coefficients variation, heating power 30 W/m

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Fig. 14

Reduced sensitivity coefficients variation, heating power 40 W/m

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