0
Research Papers

Convection-Enhanced Intravitreous Drug Delivery in Human Eye

[+] Author and Article Information
Arunn Narasimhan

Professor
Heat Transfer and Thermal Power Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Madras,
Chennai 600036, India
e-mail: arunn@iitm.ac.in

C. Sundarraj

Heat Transfer and Thermal Power Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology Madras,
Chennai 600036, India
e-mail: sundarrajchandran@gmail.com

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received April 29, 2014; final manuscript received March 16, 2015; published online August 11, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Suman Chakraborty.

J. Heat Transfer 137(12), 121003 (Aug 11, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: HT-14-1258; doi: 10.1115/1.4030916 History: Received April 29, 2014

Two-dimensional computational model has been developed for simulation of convection-assisted drug transport during intravitreal drug delivery for vitrectomized human eye. The convection current in vitreous humor was induced by laser heating. The model drug fluorescein was placed initially in different positions inside the vitreous. The transport of drug, taking the natural convection flow into account, was numerically solved using appropriate conservation equations. For a simulation period of 60 min, the convection-assisted diffusion increased the average drug mass fraction in the retinal target region by 5.7 times compared to the pure diffusion model, in case of central depot. Even for low diffusivity high molecular weight compounds, the convection in vitreous proved useful in enhancing the transport across vitreous. The study showed that inducing convection in vitreous could be potentially used for drug delivery in eye. Also laser heating could be explored as an option to enhance the delivery of drug to the posterior segment of the eye.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic showing the target region (of length 4 mm in retinal pigmental epithelium layer) for drug delivery and drug injection locations inside the eye: (1) near retina, (2) central, (3) bottom, and (4) near lens

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

The velocity contours inside the eye after 60 s of laser heating

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Drug mass fraction (Y) profiles inside the eye for the centrally injected diffusing drug at (a) t = 5 min and (b) t = 60 min

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Drug mass fraction (Y) profiles inside the eye for the centrally injected drug which diffuses under the influence of vitreous humor convection at (a) t = 5 min and (b) t = 60 min

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Mass fraction (Y) variation over time for drug injected at the central and near-lens regions for pure diffusion case and convection-enhanced diffusion case at t = 60 min

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Drug mass fraction (Y) profile for drug injected (a) near retina and (b) bottom which diffuses under the influence of convection at t = 60 min

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Mass fraction (Y) variation over time in the retinal target region for the different drug injection locations for pure diffusion case at t = 60 min

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Mass fraction (Y) variation over time in the retinal target region for the different drug injection locations for convection-enhanced diffusion case at t = 60 min

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Mass fraction (Y) variation over time in the retinal target region for the centrally injected low diffusivity drug with and without convection in vitreous at t = 60 min

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Drug mass fraction (Y) profiles inside the eye for the centrally injected drug which diffuses under the influence of vitreous humor convection at t = 5 min when the person is lying horizontally

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In