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Technical Brief

Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in Channels With Groove–Protrusions and Combination Effect With Ribs

[+] Author and Article Information
Lu Zheng

School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049, China
e-mail: water.element@stu.xjtu.edu.cn

Yonghui Xie

School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049, China
e-mail: yhxie@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Di Zhang

Key Laboratory of Thermal Fluid Science and Engineering,
Ministry of Education,
School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049, China
e-mail: zhang_di@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

Haoning Shi

School of Energy and Power Engineering,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049, China
e-mail: shihaoning@stu.xjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received October 4, 2014; final manuscript received June 24, 2015; published online August 11, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Danesh/D. K. Tafti.

J. Heat Transfer 138(1), 014501 (Aug 11, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: HT-14-1657; doi: 10.1115/1.4031077 History: Received October 04, 2014

Passive flow control and heat transfer enhancement technique has become an attractive method for device internal cooling with low resistance penalty. In the present paper, the flow and heat transfer characteristics in the small scale rectangular channel with different groove–protrusions are investigated numerically. Furthermore, the combination effect with ribs is studied. The numerical results show that on the groove side, the flow separation mainly occurs at the leading edge, and the reattachment mainly occurs at the trailing edge in accordance with the local Nusselt number distribution. On the protrusion side, the separation mainly occurs at the protrusion back porch and enhances the heat transfer at the leading edge of the downstream adjacent groove. The rectangle case provides the highest dimensionless heat transfer enhancement coefficient Nu/Nu0, dimensionless resistance coefficient f/f0, and thermal performance (TP) with the highest sensitivity of Re. When ribs are employed, the separation bubble sizes prominently decrease, especially inside the second and third grooves. The Nu/Nu0 values significantly increase when ribs are arranged, and the one-row case provides the highest heat transfer enhancement by ribs. Besides, the two-row case provides the highest Nu/Nu0 value without ribs, and the three-row case shows the lowest Nu/Nu0 value whether ribs are arranged or not.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of computational domain and boundary conditions

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Fig. 2

Spanwise cross sections and detailed parameters

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Fig. 3

Comparison of the calculated results with the experimental data: (a) Nu versus Re and (b) f/f0 versus Re

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Fig. 4

Streamlines and fluid velocity contours at the center plane of group 1 (velocity unit: m s−1): (a) case 1, (b) case 2, (c) case 3, and (d) case 4

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Fig. 5

Local Nusselt number distribution on the top wall of group 1 at Re = 30,000: (a) case 1, (b) case 2, (c) case 3, and (d) case 4

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Fig. 6

Heat transfer and flow resistance characteristic of group 1: (a) Nu/Nu0 versus Re, (b) f/f0 versus Re, (c) TP versus Re, and (d) RAPP versus Re

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Fig. 7

Streamlines and fluid velocity contours at the center plane of group 2 (velocity unit: m s−1): (a) case 5, (b) case 6, (c) case 7, (d) case 8, (e) case 9, and (f) case 10

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Fig. 8

Local Nusselt number distribution on the groove wall of group 2 at Re = 30,000: (a) case 5, (b) case 6, (c) case 7, (d) case 8, (e) case 9, and (f) case 10

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Fig. 9

Local Nusselt number distribution on the protrusion wall of group 2 at Re = 30,000: (a) case 5, (b) case 6, (c) case 7, (d) case 8, (e) case 9, and (f) case 10

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Fig. 10

Heat transfer and flow resistance characteristic of group 2: (a) Nu/Nu0 versus Re, (b) f/f0 versus Re, (c) TP versus Re, and (d) RAPP versus Re

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