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Research Papers: Porous Media

Nonequilibrium Thermal Response of Porous Media in Unsteady Heat Conduction With Sinusoidally Changing Boundary Temperature

[+] Author and Article Information
Huijin Xu

Institute of Engineering Thermophysics,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China;
Department of Energy and Power Engineering,
College of Pipeline and Civil Engineering,
China University of Petroleum (Huadong),
Qingdao 266580, China
e-mail: hjxu@upc.edu.cn

Liang Gong, Ying Yin

Department of Energy and Power Engineering,
College of Pipeline and Civil Engineering,
China University of Petroleum (Huadong),
Qingdao 266580, China

Changying Zhao

Institute of Engineering Thermophysics,
Shanghai Jiao Tong University,
Shanghai 200240, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received September 26, 2014; final manuscript received June 19, 2015; published online August 4, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Amy Fleischer.

J. Heat Transfer 137(11), 112601 (Aug 04, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: HT-14-1641; doi: 10.1115/1.4030905 History: Received September 26, 2014

The thermal response of porous foam filled with a solid material was theoretically investigated under unsteady heat conduction with a sinusoidally changing boundary temperature. The local thermal nonequilibrium (LTNE) effect between the porous foam and the infill was obvious, and the two-equation model is employed for the unsteady heat conduction in porous-solid system. The temperature difference, which was defined as the time average of the absolute value of the difference between the temperatures of the porous solid and the infill, was proposed for quantitatively describing the LTNE effect in porous media. The LTNE phenomenon for unsteady heat conduction in porous media is influenced by the fluctuation period of the thermal boundary, foam morphology, and the thermal diffusivities of the porous solid and the infill. The LTNE effect of unsteady porous-media heat conduction was evident in the region near the thermal disturbance boundary. The maximum temperature difference was found on the curve of temperature difference versus fluctuation period, which means that the thermal response characteristics of porous composites resonate with periodically changing thermal disturbance. The fluctuation period corresponding to the maximum temperature difference has positive correlations with thermal diffusion resistance for unsteady porous-media heat conduction.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Diagram of the metallic porous media filled with solid substance: (a) foam–paraffin composite and (b) physical model

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Fig. 4

Lag time in different locations

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Fig. 3

Temperature profiles as a function of time: (a) x/L = 0.2 and (b) x/L = 0.8

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Fig. 2

Comparison between present numerical solution and previous analytical solution

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Fig. 5

Spatial temperature profiles for different moments

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Fig. 6

Effects of basic parameters on the fluid–solid temperature difference: (a) porosity; (b) pore density; (c) location; (d) marching time period n; (e) foam thermal diffusivity; and (f) infill thermal diffusivity

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Fig. 7

Effects of basic parameters on temperature amplitude: (a) porosity; (b) pore density; (c) location; (d) marching time period n; (e) foam thermal diffusivity; and (f) infill thermal diffusivity

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