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Research Papers: Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer

Effect of Hydrophilic Nanostructured Cupric Oxide Surfaces on the Heat Transport Capability of a Flat-Plate Oscillating Heat Pipe

[+] Author and Article Information
F. Z. Zhang, W. J. Black, M. R. Wilson

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211

R. A. Winholtz

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211
e-mail: winholtz@missouri.edu

H. Taub

Department of Physics and Astronomy,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211
e-mail: taubh@missouri.edu

H. B. Ma

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Missouri,
Columbia, MO 65211
e-mail: mah@missouri.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received October 16, 2014; final manuscript received December 31, 2015; published online March 22, 2016. Editor: Terry Simon.

J. Heat Transfer 138(6), 062901 (Mar 22, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: HT-14-1678; doi: 10.1115/1.4032608 History: Received October 16, 2014; Revised December 31, 2015

With a surface treatment of hydrophilic cupric oxide (CuO) nanostructures on the channels inside a flat-plate oscillating heat pipe (FP-OHP), the wetting effect on the thermal performance of an FP-OHP was experimentally investigated. Three FP-OHP configurations were tested: (1) evaporator treated, (2) condenser treated, and (3) untreated. Both evaporator- and condenser-treated FP-OHPs show significantly enhanced performance. The greatest improvement was seen in the condenser-treated FP-OHP, a 60% increase in thermal performance. Neutron imaging provided insight into the fluid dynamics inside the FP-OHPs. These findings show that hydrophilic nanostructures and their placement play a key role in an OHP's performance.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the FP-OHP investigated (all dimensions are in millimeters). Channels are 1 mm wide and 1.5 mm deep. Black circles indicate thermocouple locations.

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Fig. 2

Fabricated FP-OHP without the cover plate

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Fig. 3

SEM images of the CuO nanostructures with magnifications of 10,000 × (top) and 138,061 × (bottom)

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Fig. 4

Sessile-drop test on nontreated copper at 60 deg contact angle (top) and treated copper with CuO surface nanostructures (bottom), showing the hydrophilicity of the nanostructured surface with a ∼12 deg contact angle

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Fig. 5

Schematic of the entire experimental setup at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research

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Fig. 6

Detailed view of the thermal portion of the experimental setup

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Fig. 7

Measurements of the temperature difference across the FP-OHP as a function of heat input, comparing the untreated heat pipe with one treated with CuO first in the condenser and then in the evaporator

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Fig. 8

Liquid and vapor distribution in the nanostructured condenser configuration at a power input of 75 W at selected times after achieving steady-state conditions: (a) 3 s, (b) 5 s, and (c) 10 s

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Fig. 9

Liquid and vapor distribution in the nanostructured condenser configuration at a power input of 225 W at selected times after achieving steady-state conditions: (a) 3 s, (b) 5 s, and (c) 10 s

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Fig. 10

Liquid and vapor distribution in the nanostructured evaporator configuration at a power input of 115 W at selected times after achieving steady-state conditions: (a) 3 s, (b) 5 s, and (c) 10 s

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Fig. 11

Liquid and vapor distribution in the nanostructured evaporator configuration at a power input of 225 W at selected times after achieving steady-state conditions: (a) 3 s, (b) 5 s, and (c) 10 s

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