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Research Papers: Thermal Systems

Transient Modeling of a Capillary Pumped Loop for Terrestrial Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Nicolas Blet, Yves Bertin, Cyril Romestant

Institut Pprime,
CNRS-ENSMA-Université de Poitiers,
UPR 3346,
1, avenue Clément Ader,
Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex 86961, France

Vincent Platel

LaTEP,
Université de Pau,
et des Pays de l'Adour,
Quartier Bastillac,
Tarbes 65000, France

Vincent Ayel

Institut Pprime,
CNRS-ENSMA-Université de Poitiers,
UPR 3346,
1, avenue Clément Ader,
Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex 86961, France
e-mail: vincent.ayel@ensma.fr

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received June 22, 2015; final manuscript received March 1, 2016; published online April 5, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Gennady Ziskind.

J. Heat Transfer 138(7), 072802 (Apr 05, 2016) (15 pages) Paper No: HT-15-1429; doi: 10.1115/1.4032960 History: Received June 22, 2015; Revised March 01, 2016

Improvement of a new design for a capillary pumped loop (CPL) ensuring high-dissipation electronics cooling in ground transportation has been carried out over recent years. Experimental studies on the hybrid loop, which share some characteristics with the standard CPL and loop heat pipe (LHP), have underlined the sizable potential of this new system, particularly with regard to its upcoming industrial applications. In order to obtain a reliable tool for sizing and design of this CPL for terrestrial applications (CPLTA), the present transient thermohydraulic modeling has been developed. Based on the nodal method, the model's originality consists of transcribing balance equations under electrical networks by analogy. The model's validation is provided by experimental results from a new CPLTA bench with three parallel evaporators. Large-scale numerical evaluation of loop behavior in a gravity field with a single evaporator shall facilitate understanding of the different couplings between loop parts. In addition, modeling of a multi-evaporator loop is introduced and compared with recent experimental results.

Copyright © 2016 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

CPLTA design and associated (P,T) diagram in operation

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Fig. 2

Fluid nodes and boundary conditions of the CERBERE modeling

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Fig. 3

Meshes and variables locations

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Fig. 4

The four networks of lines with thermohydraulic couplings

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Fig. 5

The four networks of reservoir and evaporator models

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Fig. 6

Thermal conductance at evaporator Gev

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Fig. 7

Thermal model of reservoir and variables locations

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Fig. 8

CERBERE loop design and instrumentation

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Fig. 9

Identified conductance at reservoir Gl,r for each single evaporator (Tref=70 °C and TII=20 °C)

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Fig. 10

Identified conductance at evaporator Gev for each single evaporator (Tref=70 °C and TII=20 °C)

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Fig. 11

Steady-state comparison between experimental and numerical results: temperatures (evaporator n∘1, Φev = 1000 W, Tref = 70 °C and TII = 20 °C)

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Fig. 12

Steady-state comparison between experimental and numerical results: mass flow rates (evaporator n∘1, Tref = 70 °C and TII = 20 °C)

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Fig. 13

Steady-state comparison between experimental and numerical results: pressure drops (evaporator n∘1, Tref = 70 °C and TII = 20 °C)

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Fig. 14

Transient comparison between experimental and numerical results: heat power increase Φev from 400 W to 1000 W (evaporator n∘2, Tref = 70 °C and TII = 20 °C): (a) evaporator inlet mass flow rate, (b) condenser outlet mass flow rate, (c) reservoir pressure, (d) evaporator pressures, (e) evaporator inlet wall temperature, and (f) evaporator body average temperature

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Fig. 15

Transient comparison between experimental and numerical results: heat power decrease Φev from 1000 W to 400 W (evaporator n∘2, Tref = 70 °C and TII = 20 °C): (a) evaporator inlet mass flow rate, (b) condenser outlet mass flow rate, (c) evaporator pressures, and (d) evaporator body average temperature

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Fig. 16

Thermal model of reservoir with three evaporators in parallel

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Fig. 17

Heat power solicitations during a comparative test with three evaporators

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Fig. 18

Comparative test with three parallel evaporators in operation (reservoir 70 °C and condenser 20 °C): (a) mass flow rates, (b) pressures at evaporators, (c) temperatures at evaporator inlets, and (d) temperatures at evaporator bodies

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