0
Research Papers: Micro/Nanoscale Heat Transfer

Thermal Diffraction of Binary Fluids With Metal Nanoparticles

[+] Author and Article Information
Heriberto Vasquez Carrasco, Steven Vallone, Joseph Hui

Department of Physics,
Queens College of the City
University of New York,
65-30 Kissena Boulevard,
Flushing, NY 11367

Matthew Moocarme

Department of Physics,
The Graduate Center of the City
University of New York,
365 5th Avenue,
New York, NY 10016;
Department of Physics,
Queens College of the City
University of New York,
65-30 Kissena Boulevard,
Flushing, NY 11367

Nicholas Proscia

Department of Physics,
The Graduate Center of the City
University of New York,
365 5th Avenue,
New York, NY 10016

Luat T. Vuong

Department of Physics,
The Graduate Center of the City
University of New York,
365 5th Avenue,
New York, NY 10016;
Department of Physics,
Queens College of the City
University of New York,
65-30 Kissena Boulevard,
Flushing, NY 11367
e-mail: luat.vuong@qc.cuny.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received August 19, 2015; final manuscript received March 26, 2016; published online May 10, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Laurent Pilon.

J. Heat Transfer 138(8), 082401 (May 10, 2016) (6 pages) Paper No: HT-15-1556; doi: 10.1115/1.4033328 History: Received August 19, 2015; Revised March 26, 2016

A laser propagating through a metal nanocolloid exhibits a far-field fringe pattern that is the signature of its optical and thermally induced response. Here, we directly exploit the sensitive far-field features to measure the thermo-optic coefficients of binary-solvent mixtures of ethanol and water. This study extends our fundamental understanding of the thermal self-diffraction toward future optical characterization of the nanocolloid fluid motion.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Beam parameters and nomenclature. A Gaussian beam with mode field radius w(z) illuminates a nanofluid sample of length d from the left.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Top-view schematic of the optical setup (not drawn to scale). Light from the laser is transmitted through a half-wave plate and LP prior to the nanofluid or nanocolloid sample, where s is the distance between the sample and camera.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

CCD images of the diffraction patterns in the far-field plane. The mode field radius is calculated along the horizontal (blue) and vertical (red) line-outs across the patterns. The far-field diffraction patterns are shown for (a) 0.15 ethanol concentration and 100 mW average power, (b) 0.15 ethanol concentration and 200 mW average power, (c) 0.30 ethanol concentration and 100 mW average power, and (d) 0.30 ethanol concentration and 200 mW illumination power.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Aspect ratios of the far-field fringe patterns versus ethanol concentration. The ratio approaches linear behavior at higher powers and exhibits a jump at lower powers, which could represent the onset of nanofluid convective flows.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Defocusing angle θdef as a function of average applied illumination power. The slope of the linear trend is proportional to the calculated thermo-optic coefficient.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

The calculated thermo-optic coefficients dn/dT from this investigation compared to Arnaud's experimental results. The values deviate at ethanol fractions above 20%, where sharp changes in aspect ratio are also measured (Fig. 4).

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In