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Research Papers: Forced Convection

Analysis of Conjugate Heat Transfer for a Combined Turbulent Wall Jet and Offset Jet

[+] Author and Article Information
Tanmoy Mondal

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur,
Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal, India

Abhijit Guha

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur,
Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal, India

Manab Kumar Das

Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur,
Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal, India
e-mail: manab@mech.iitkgp.ernet.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Heat Transfer Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF HEAT TRANSFER. Manuscript received May 30, 2014; final manuscript received November 30, 2015; published online January 27, 2016. Assoc. Editor: P. K. Das.

J. Heat Transfer 138(5), 051701 (Jan 27, 2016) (13 pages) Paper No: HT-14-1359; doi: 10.1115/1.4032287 History: Received May 30, 2014; Revised November 30, 2015

This paper presents a study of the conjugate heat transfer, involving conduction through a solid slab and turbulent convection in fluid, for a combined turbulent wall jet and offset jet flow using unsteady Reynolds averaged Navier–Stokes (URANS) equations. The conduction equation for the solid slab and convection equation for the fluid region are solved simultaneously satisfying the equality of temperature and heat flux at the solid–fluid interface. The fluid flow is complex because of the existence of periodically unsteady interaction between the two jets for the chosen ratio of jets separation distance to the jet width (i.e., d/w = 1). The heat transfer characteristics at the solid–fluid interface have been investigated by varying various important parameters within a feasible range: Reynolds number (Re = 10,000–20,000), Prandtl number (Pr = 1–4), solid-to-fluid thermal conductivity ratio (ks/kf = 1000–4000), and nondimensional solid slab thickness (s/w = 1–10). The bottom surface of the solid slab has been maintained at a constant temperature. The mean conjugate heat transfer characteristics indicate that the mean local Nusselt number along the interface is a function of flow (Re) as well as fluid (Pr) properties but is independent of solid properties (ks and s). However, the mean interface temperature and mean local heat flux along the interface always depend on all the aforementioned properties.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Schematic representation of boundary and interface conditions for temperature in conjugate heat transfer for a combined wall jet and offset jet flow over a heated solid slab (ABCD)

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Fig. 3

Results of the grid independence test showing mean streamwise velocity (U¯) profiles of the dual jet flow for various grid densities

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Fig. 4

Grid layout for (a) fluid region (BHIC) and (b) solid region (ABCD)

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Fig. 5

Variation of maximum mean streamwise velocity (U¯m) with the downstream distance for (a) a dual jet with d/w = 1 and (b) an offset jet with OR = 2.5

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Fig. 6

Variation of normalized mean skin friction coefficient (C¯fx/C¯fx,m) for an offset jet with OR = 7

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Fig. 7

Mean temperature (θ¯) profiles of a wall jet at (a) X = 10.4 and (b) X = 20.3

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Fig. 1

Schematic diagram of a dual jet consisting of a wall jet and an offset jet showing the development of flow over a solid slab (adapted from Wang and Tan [17])

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Fig. 8

Mean temperature (θ¯) profiles of an offset jet with OR = 3 at (a) X = 7.3 and (b) X = 21.5

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Fig. 9

Variation of mean local Nusselt number (Nu¯x) for an offset jet with OR = 3

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Fig. 10

Instantaneous vorticity contours for the dual jet flow with d/w = 1 showing the generation of von Kármán like vortex street within a time period T at various time instants: (a) T/4, (b) T/2, (c) 3T/4, and (d) T (solid and dashed lines indicate positive and negative vorticity, respectively)

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Fig. 11

Variation of skin friction coefficient (Cfx) and local Nusselt number (Nux) in relation to the instantaneous vorticity contours for Re = 10,000, Pr = 1, K = 1000, and S = 10

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Fig. 12

Mean temperature contours of coupled solid–fluid region for (a) Re = 10,000, Pr = 1, K = 1000, and S = 10, (b) Re = 20,000, Pr = 1, K = 1000, and S = 10, (c) Re = 10,000, Pr = 4, K = 4000, and S = 10, (d) Re = 10,000, Pr = 1, K = 4000, and S = 10, and (e) Re = 10,000, Pr = 1, K = 1000, and S = 1. The line at Y = 0 indicates the interface of solid and fluid regions.

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Fig. 13

Variation of mean local Nusselt number (Nu¯x) along the solid–fluid interface for various values of (a) Re with Pr = 1, K = 1000, and S = 10, (b) Pr with Re = 10,000 and S = 10, (c) K with Re = 10,000, Pr = 1, and S = 10 and (d) S with Re = 10,000, Pr = 1, and K = 1000

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Fig. 14

Variation of mean interface temperature (θ¯i) for various (a) Re with Pr = 1, K = 1000, and S = 10, (b) Pr with Re = 10,000 and S = 10, (c) K with Re = 10,000, Pr = 1, and S = 10 and (d) S with Re = 10,000, Pr = 1, and K = 1000

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Fig. 15

Variation of mean local heat flux (q¯x) for various (a) Re with Pr = 1, K = 1000, and S = 10, (b) Pr with Re = 10,000 and S = 10, (c) K with Re = 10,000, Pr = 1, and S = 10 and (d) S with Re = 10,000, Pr = 1, and K = 1000

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